Expanded Course Descriptions: Fall 2013

Please click here to see the Spanish Lower Division Fall Schedule as a PDF

Please click here to see the Spanish Upper Division Fall Schedule as a PDF


Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units)

Charles Oriel, Lecturer
MWF 10:00-11:50A, 25 Wellman
CRN 50614

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 111N: The Structure of Spanish: Sounds and Words (4 units)

Travis Bradley, Associate Professor
MWF 1:10-2:00P, 184 Young
CRN 54039

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, 24S, or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • José Ignacio Hualde, et al., Introducción a la Lingüistica Hispánica (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 130: Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700 (4 units)

Charles Oriel, Lecturer
MWF 12:10-1:00P, 106 Olson
CRN 50620

Course Description: In this course, we'll read representative works from the Spanish Middle Ages ( roughly 1100-1500) and the Golden Age (1500-1680): readings will include selections from the Poema de Mio Cid, El Conde Lucanor, El libro de buen amor, medieval ballads, Las coplas de Jorge Manrique, La Celestina, Lazarillo de Tormes, poetry by Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Luis de Góngora, Francisco de Quevedo and, finally, the comedia.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Antonia Sanchez-Romeraldo, Antologia de Autores Espanoles: Antiguous y Modernos, Volume 1 (Pearson, 1972)
     

Spanish 142: Women's Coming of Age Stories in Modern Spanish Writing / "Historias de iniciación femenina en la literatura española moderna" (4 units)

Marta Altisent, Professor
TR 1:40-3:00P, 2016 Haring
CRN 50622

Course Description: This course will critically analyze five coming of age fictions of well-established and contemporary women writers of Spain that best represent the internal and external trajectories and vicissitudes young women face when reaching maturity in a patriarchal culture that is rapidly changing.  In these stories, adulthood is not a goal but a work-in-progress, a construction of self-hood full of personal, interpersonal and social implications, a process geared to the acquisition of a moral code, an emotional intelligence, sexual experience, professional and intellectual fulfillment,  physical strength, economic independence, political consciousness or an understanding of the ''other''. We will also analyze the modes used to subvert patriarchal values and realistic representation by including some of the experimental currents and movements in 20th-century imaginative writing: Surrealism, metafiction, Phantasy.  The fictions will be discussed in relation to contemporary feminist principles of criticism, contrasting what is called “the feminine” in psychoanalytic, philosophical, and literary writings of the European poststructuralist tradition with the feminists practices in the US and Latin America. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Lucia Etxebarria, Amor, Curiosidad, Prozac y Dudas (Booket, 2009)
  • Josefina Aldecoa, Historia de una Maestra (Punto de Lectura, 2007)
  • Merce Redoreda, La Plaza del Diamante (Edhasa, 2007)
  • Carmen Laforet, Nada (Austral, 2012)
  • Nuria Amat, Reina de America (Ediciones Era, 2003)
  • Esther Tusquets, Siete Miradas en un Mismo Paisaje (Anagrama, 2001)
     

Spanish 148: Cinema in the Spanish-Speaking World in Translation (4 units)

Staff
Lecture: TR 12:10-1:30P, 146 Olson
Film Viewing: T 6:10-9:00P, 106 Olson
CRN 50624

Course Description: This course will analyze the construction of Spanish identity and the socio-historical events that have shaped it through film. The selection of movies and texts presented in this class will help the students to improve their ability to read films aesthetically, culturally, and historically. Cultural aspects such as gender differences, the role of women in Spanish society, the political situation, social structures, economical aspects, power institutions, religion will be studied through movies. The emphasis will be on the cultural information illustrated by these films. No prior knowledge of cinematography techniques and principles will be required. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S, or 33.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture—3 hours; Film Viewing - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 155: Mexican Novel (4 units)

Linda Egan, Professor
TR 9:00-10:20A, 212 Veihmeyer
CRN 53511

Course Description: This is a survey course on the historic-cultural, theoretical and analytical study tracing the evolution of the Mexican Novel from it roots in the colonial period and nineteenth century to the present. Major goals of the course include acquisition of knowledge about the sociopolitical reality influencing significant stages in the Mexican novel’s development, iteration of the major literary tendencies reflected in the novel over time (romantic, realistic, etc.) and application of critical and theoretical concepts through close textual readings. Emphasis is on the narrative of the Revolution as it undergoes formal and ideological transformations.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Angeles Mastretta, Arrancame la Vida (Seix Barral, 2004)
  • Carlos Fuentes, La Muerte de Artemio Cruz (Punto de Lectura, 2010)
  • Mariano Azuela, Los de Abajo (Catedra, 1996)
  • Juan Rulfo, Pedro Paramo (Catedra, 2006)
     

Spanish 157: Cross-Border Fictions (4 units)

Robert Newcomb, Assistant Professor
MW 10:00-11:50A, 168 Hoagland
CRN 50626

Course Description: This course examines a series of late 20th and early 21st century Latin American short stories and novels that deal with cross-border issues, including migration, exile, travel, cosmopolitanism, and hybrid and mutli-cultural identities. While the U.S.-Mexico border will be touched upon, we will spend far more time examining instances of border-crossing within Latin America, as well as between Latin America and other areas of the globe, including Canada, Western Europe, and Africa. Class discussions and primary readings will in Spanish, with the exception of Dominican-American writer’s Junot Diáz’s The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

Novels and short stories:

  • Alejo Carpentier, El reino de este mundo
  • Julio Cortázar, Las armas secretas (selection)
  • Roberto Bolaño, Amuleto
  • Horacio Castellanos Moya, El asco
  • Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Films:

  • Terra estrangeira (A Foreign Land, dir. Walter Salles)
  • Traffic (dir. Steven Soderbergh)

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 159: Mexican Short Fiction (4 units)

Linda Egan, Professor
TR 1:40-3:00P, 1130 Hart
CRN 53512

Course Description: Students will be introduced to what has been called the favored genre in Mexican narrative: brief prose fictions in the form of short stories or novellas. Due to the brevity of the course, we will focus on the period from the Mexican Revolution (1910) to the present. Authors will include the best-known canonical writers as well as excellent narrators among the newer additions to Mexican letters.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carlos Fuentes, Aura
  • Jose Emilio Pacheco, Las Batallas en el Desierto
     

Spanish 159: Brazilian Literature in Translation (4 units)

Robert Newcomb, Assistant Professor
MW 2:10-4:00P, 1130 Hart
CRN 54035

Course Description: This course serves to introduce an English-speaking audience to the literature of Brazil, Latin America’s largest country and a rising economic and political power. Through our reading of a cross-section of Brazilian novels and short stories, and our viewing of two classic Brazilian films, we will trace the country’s historical evolution from Portuguese colony, to independence in 1822, to its early 21st century “emergence” onto the world stage. Major themes to be discussed through the prism of Brazilian literature include: Brazilian national myths, heroes, and stereotypes; race, class, and gender relations; economic modernization and poverty; internal migration; law, criminality, and violence; marginal and marginalized communities in Brazil; and historical memory.  Class discussions and all readings will be in English. No knowledge of Portuguese required, though Portuguese-speaking students should inform the professor at the beginning of the quarter.

Novels and short stories:

  • Manuel Antônio de Almeida, Memoirs of a Militia Sergeant
  • Machado de Assis, “Father Against Mother”; “The Rod of Justice”
  • Graciliano Ramos, Barren Lives
  • Clarice Lispector, Family Ties
  • Rubem Fonseca, The Taker and Other Stories

Films:

  • Barren Lives, dir. Nelson Pereira dos Santos
  • City of God, dir. Fernando Meirelles

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Manuel Antonio de Almeida, Memoirs of a Militia Sergeant (Oxford University Press, 2000)
  • Rubem Fonseca, The Taker and Other Stories (University of Nebraska Press, 2008)
     

Spanish 160: Latin American Women Writers in Translation (4 units)

Ana Peluffo, Associate Professor
TR 3:10-4:30P, 1130 Hart
CRN 53513

Course Description: In this course we will read texts by Latin American women writers from different cultural areas in Latin America. We will read biographical pieces, essays, interviews, short stories, and travel narratives by Flora Tristan, Matilde Mellibovsky, Blanca Varela, Victoria Ocampo, Eva Perón, Hebe de Bonifini, Elena Garro, and Rigoberta Menchú, among others. We will discuss strategies of self representation for female cultural producers, issues of gender and memory, the complicated relationship between women, and culture and political activism in Latin America. The class will be conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities, Diversity, and Writing Experience.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 170: Introduction to Latin American Culture (4 units)

Sec. 01. Michael Lazzara, Associate Professor
TR 10:30-11:50A, 192 Young
CRN 50627

Sec. 02. Michael Lazzara, Associate Professor
TR 12:10-1:30P, 192 Young
CRN 54014

Course Description: This course provides a general introduction to Latin American culture while presenting students with critical tools for analyzing a broad range of cultural texts, including short stories, poetry, essays, literary crónicas, political discourses, popular legends, films, paintings, popular music and testimonies. Sample cultural texts will be analyzed from different time periods—though emphasis will be placed on the post-1960s era—with an eye toward understanding their politics, aesthetics, ethics, and ideologies. This course will serve as a “gateway” course that seeks to equip students with the tools needed to succeed in more advanced upper division Spanish courses. Topics to be considered may include: colonialism, the “idea” of Latin America, cultural heterogeneity, identity formations, social movements, violence and dictatorship, globalization, and neoliberalism.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 174: Chicano Culture (4 units)

Francisco Alarcón, Lecturer
MWF 11:00-11:50A, 166 Chemistry
CRN 53514


Course Description: An interdisciplinary survey of Chicano culture. Topics include literature, art, folklore, oral tradition, music, politics, as well as “everyday” cultural manifestations. The course is conducted in Spanish. This is a survey of the culture of the Mexican people from the pre-Hispanic period to the present. Pre-Hispanic concepts, myths, symbols, and legends present in Chicano culture are traced to their Mexican origins. The concept of Fifth Sun, Luis Valdez’s "Pensamiento Serpentino", the myths of Quetzalcoatl and Aztlán, and the Aztec homeland are examined, as well as the Mesoamerican concept of self and time. The period of conquest of Mexico by Spain is examined, both as presented by historians and interpreted by Octavio Paz in his book, El laberinto de la soleded. The turmoil of the first half of the nineteenth century in Mexico and implications of the annexation of the southwest to the U.S., by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848 are studied. Also examined are the origins of the stereotypes of the Mexican/Chicano found in American society, such as the pocho, the pachuco, and the cholo. The literary and artistic expressions of the Chicano Movement of the past twenty-five years are also analyzed as part of this course.

The course format consists of lectures by the instructor, occasional guest speakers, screening of a few films and class discussions based on the assigned readings. A term paper is a course requirement. This research paper should be on a topic illustrating an aspect of Chicano culture. Students are required to attend a one-hour discussion session every week.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, or 33.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA