Expanded Course Descriptions Graduate: Spring 2014

Spanish 207: History of the Spanish Language (4 units)
Robert Blake

T 4:10-7:00P
117 Olson
CRN 42706

Course Description:  
This course will give graduate students a solid background in the evolution of Spanish from its Latin origins. The course will begin with a theoretical discussion of how and why languages change. Students will examine the lexical, phonological and syntactic changes that have occurred from Vulgar Latin to Old Spanish to Medieval Spanish (c. 1600). Particular emphasis will be paid to some of the earliest textual manifestations of the Spanish language: namely, the jarchas, glosas, notarial documents, El Cantar del Mio Cid, and the Alfonsine writings.

Prerequisite: Latin 001.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Ralph Penny, Gramática Histórica del Español [2nd Edition]  (Ariel, 1993)
     

Spanish 224: Cervantes’ Delight: The First Best-Sellers of Castilian Literature (4 units)
Cristina Gonzalez

R 4:10-7:00P
263 Olson

CRN 42709

Course Description: 
The invention of the printing press brought about great social change. Reading for pleasure became possible for large numbers of people, who eagerly consumed romances involving love and adventure.  Many of these romances were quite long, such as the numerous imitations of Amadís de Gaula written in the course of the 16th Century.  But there were other romances that were chosen by publishers because they could be produced cheaply due to their short length.  In consideration of the important role publishers had in selecting and revising them, these fast-paced romances of medieval origin have been called a “publishers’ genre.”  These exciting narratives delighted the public of the Early Modern Era, and their readers encompassed a wide variety of people, from the Catholic Monarchs to Miguel de Cervantes, who was particularly fond of them.  This course will study a number of works representative of this “publishers’ genre,” including Enrique Fi de Oliva and Tablante de Ricamonte, which are key sources of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • John Edwards, Ferdinand and Isabella  (Routledge, 2004)
     

Spanish 257: Seres salvajes: Wild, Feral, and Intractable Humans in Early Modern Spanish Drama (4 units)
John Slater

M 4:10-7:00P
111 Wellman

CRN 43772

Course Description: 
The story of Segismundo, the protagonist of Calderón’s La vida es sueño, is familiar: a savage man becomes a worthy prince almost overnight, thanks to a cruel ruse.  One of the most surprising things about this story, however, is how often versions of it appear in seventeenth-century drama.  Wild men and wild women—whether easily civilized or insensible to the attractions of urban life—are a major feature of early modern plays.  In this course we will read canonical and non-canonical works of seventeenth-century drama with a particular object in mind: to explore what Roger Bartra has called the early modern preoccupation with “wildness” that exists “within civilization itself.”  In plays such as La vida es sueñoEn la vida todo es verdad y todo mentira, and La piedra filosofal, wild men and women are not simply elements of a recurring motif but the constituents of a tightly-knit corpus of plays that plumbs the wild properties of humankind.  One of our central questions will be, “What work, (philosophical, cultural, literary or otherwise) does “savage royalty” accomplish in these plays and in imperial discourse more broadly?

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Pedro Calderón de la Barca, La Vida es Sueño  (Catedra)
     

Spanish 274 (Sec. 01): Novelas de la tierra/Romances regionalistas (4 units)
Leopoldo Bernucci

R 4:10-7:00P
622 Sproul

CRN 40201

Course Description: 
An examination of four novels known as “novelas de la tierra” (Spanish America) or “romances regionalistas” (Brazil) both from the standpoint of their individually geographical representation and a somewhat uniform fictional corpus representative of a narrative poetics produced in the early 20th century. Questions on how and why the so- called neo-naturalist novel and/or regional novel (novelas de la tierra, novelas de Revolución Mexicana, novelas criollistas, romances regionalistas) is formed during the 1920s and 1930s, its co-existence with the Brazilian avant-garde (modernista) fiction, and the local-universal dichotomy in its representation will be discussed. The course aims to compare novels written in Spanish and Portuguese leading to a discussion and an understanding of their differences and similarities, and their relationship between politico-philosophical ideologies and artistic exoticism.

Course Evaluation
 3 Quizzes: 50%, Term Paper: 30%, Seminar Participation: 20% (oral presentation, attendance, and active participation leading to discussion).

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • José Eustasio Rivera, La vorágine  (Catedra, 2006)
  • Rómulo Gallegos, Doña Bárbara  (Catedra, 1997)
  • Rachel de Queiroz, O quinze  (Editora Jose Olympio)
  • Graciliano Ramos, Vidas secas  (Editora Record, 2003)
     

Spanish 274 (Sec. 02): Studies of a Major Writer, Period, or Genre in Latin American Literature (4 units)
Ana Peluffo

W 4:10-7:00P
109 Wellman

CRN 42707

Course Description: 
In this course we will study a wide variety of filmic responses to the severe economic crisis that took place in Argentina in 2001. We will pay particular attention to new theoretical approaches on the construction of subjectivities in Latin American Studies and to the ways in which films question the expansion of neoliberal policies and globalization. Theoretical work on film studies, gender and ethnicity will be introduced in the course in  the hope that students will be able to transpose these critical paradigms to other Latin American contexts.

Films by Lucrecia Martel, Lucía Puenzo, Adrián Caetano, Martín Rejtman, Fabián Bielinsky, Gustavo Taretto,  Diego Lerman, and Celina Murga, among others will be analyzed in the course.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Joanna Page, Crisis and Capitalism in Contemporary Argentine Cinema  (Duke University Press, 2009)