Expanded Course Descriptions: Spring 2013

Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism

Marta Altisent, Professor
Sec. 01. TR 12:10-1:30P
, 229 Wellman
CRN 59753

Charles Oriel, Lecturer
Sec. 02. MWF 10:00-10:50A, 229 Wellman
CRN 62386

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 111N: The Structure of Spanish: Sounds and Words

Travis Bradley, Associate Professor
MWF 1:10-2:00P, 158 Olson
CRN 59755

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, 24S, or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): SocSci.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, Antxon Olarrea, and Anna Maria Escobar, Introdución a la Linguistica Hispanica (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 115: History of the Spanish Language

Robert Blake, Professor
TR 10:30-11:50A, 166 Chemistry
CRN 62387

Course Description: This course examines the Spanish language from its roots in spoken Latin to modernity. There will be emphasis on the close relationship between historical events and language change, and the role that literature plays in language standardization. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 115S.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, 24S, or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum or SocSci.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • David A. Pharies, Breve historia de la lengua espanola: Spanish edition (University of Chicago Press, 2007)
     

Spanish 116: Applied Spanish Linguistics

Robert Blake, Professor
TR 3:10-4:30P, 1150 Hart
CRN 59756

Course Description: In this course students will review both the most difficult structural properties of Spanish (e.g. aspect, mood, subordination, sequence of tenses) as well as the most promising methodological approaches to teaching Spanish.  The course will be informed by insights from the field of applied linguistics, including CALL, computer-assisted language learning, and pragmatics.  The material is appropriate for anyone in general wishing to deepen their linguistic knowledge of Spanish as well as for future language professionals who specifically seek a career in teaching Spanish at the secondary or post-secondary levels.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24 or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): SocSci.

Format: Lecture-3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Dale A. Koike and Carol A. Klee, Lingüistica aplicada: Adquisición del español como segunda lengua (Wiley, 2012)
     

Spanish 123: Creative Writing in Spanish

Francisco Alarcon, Lecturer
MWF 11:00-11:50A, 25 Wellman
CRN 59757

Course Description: 
This workshop course is an intensive writing of poetry or fiction in Spanish or in a bilingual (Spanish/English) format. Workshop will focus on the Chicano/Latino experience within the U.S. Students will write both in prescribed forms and in experimental forms of their own choosing. Offered in alternate years. The course will have the format of a seminar or literary workshop in which all participants will have the opportunity to critically comment on works presented by their peers in class. Poetry and narrative fiction will be the main literary genres covered during the quarter. Other genres like drama and autobiographical essays could also be reviewed following the particular interests of the participants. The class will be conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): WrtExp.

Format: Discussion - 4 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Carmelo Virigllo et al., Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica (McGraw-Hill, 2011)
  • Francisco X. Alarcón, From the Other Side of Night/Del otro lado de la noche: New and Selected Poems (University of Arizona Press, 2002)
  • Jose Olivio Jimenez, Antología de la poesía hispanoamericana contemporánea 1914-1987 (Continental Book, Co., 2000)
     

Spanish 133N: Golden Age Literature of Spain

Emily Kuffner, Graduate Student
MWF 12:10-1:00P, 251 Olson
CRN 59759


Course Description: This course will trace the origins and development of the figure of the pícaro, and his female counterpart the pícara, through the 16th and 17th century.  We will consider the following texts: Lazarillo de Tormes, and La vida del buscón, as well as selections from the work of Alonso de Castillo Solórzano, María de Zayas, and Miguel de Cervantes.  We will examine the figure of the rogue as a response to and critique of social and cultural developments in Golden Age Spain.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Francisco de Quevedo, La vida del buscon (European Masterpieces, 2007)
  • Annette Grant Cash and James C. Murray, Vida de Lazarillo de Tormes y de sus fortunas y adversidades (Juan de la Cuesta, 2002)
     

Spanish 134B: Don Quijote II

Charles Oriel, Lecturer
MWF 1:10-2:00P, 146 Olson
CRN 62388


Course Description: This course is the continuation of SPA 134A: we will read and study Cervantes' continuation (the second volume) of Don Quijote, published in 1615, ten years after the appearance of the first volume. Aside from considering various social, cultural and political aspects of Spain's Golden Age--along with Cervantes' invention of the modern novel--we will also explore some of the influences that Cervantes' masterpiece has exercised on subsequent authors.

Prerequisite: Spanish 134A.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quijote (European Masterpieces, 2012)  [This is the same title used in Spanish 134A]
  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 142: Special Topics in Spanish Cultural and Literary Studies

Tim Johnson, Graduate Student
MWF 9:00-9:50A, 207 Olson
CRN 59761

Course Description: The Golden Age of Spanish letters coincided with her rise and fall as a global superpower during almost two centuries of constant wars of politics, religion, and conquest. Both literature and armed violence claimed status as liberal arts. Paradoxically, the old debate on the superiority of Letters or Arms, famously retold by Don Quijote (pt. I, ch. 38), was resolved from within literature itself in texts that made war a literary topic and a source for inspiration. Technological and philosophical aspects of war could be studied from books, and soldiers who were skilled with a sword showed their intellect by taking up the pen.

This course will take a transatlantic perspective in examining early modern Spanish texts that bring together the two themes of sapientia et fortitudo (knowledge and strength) as they pertain to the subjects of just war, the chivalric ideal, gender, and the Other. We will read works and selections by Captain Hernán Cortés, involuntary shaman Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, soldier-poet Alonso de Ercilla, one-handed novelist Miguel de Cervantes, and the cross-dressed lieutenant nun Catalina de Erauso, among others.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Catalina de Erauso, Historia de la Monja Alferez (Catedra, 2006)
  • Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca, Naufragios (Catedra, 2006)
  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 151: Survey of Latin American Literature 1900 to Present

Ana Peluffo, Associate Professor
TR 9:00-10:20A, 204 Art

CRN 59766

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to  Latin American literature through the close reading of major writers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Particular attention will be given to the social and cultural context of short stories, poems and music  from different cultural areas of Latin America.  Topics to be discussed include:  tradition and modernity; coloniality; civilization and barbarism; discourses of gender and ethnicity; and  the relationship between literature and other arts.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture—3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion—1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Rachel Chang-Rodriguez and Malva E. Filer, Voces de Hispanoamerica (Heinle, 2012)
     

Spanish 154: The Latin American Novel at the Limit

Robert Newcomb, Assistant Professor
MWF 12:10-1:00P, 217 Art
CRN 62389

Course Description: This course explores a series of novels that may or may not be “Latin American,” and in so doing, asks these broader questions: what is Latin America, who “counts” as a Latin American writer, and what is a “real” Latin American novel? We will begin with Spanish writer Ramón del Vallé-Inclán’s Tirano Banderas (1926), an experimental novel influenced by Nicaraguan modernista poet Rubén Darío, set in a fictitious Latin American country and an early example of the novela del dictador. We will then read Brazilian novelist Graciliano Ramos’s Vidas Secas (1938) in Spanish translation. This novel takes place in a country – Brazil – that depending on one’s definition may or may not be Latin American, but deals with issues of rural poverty, labor exploitation, and internal migration that are central to the Latin American literary and cultural experience. After reading Argentine writer Julio Cortázar’s classic short story El Perseguidor (1959), which concerns a drug-addicted American jazz musician living in France, we will conclude with Dominican-American novelist Junot Díaz’s tragicomic masterpiece The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (2007), whose immigrant protagonists regularly cross borders and move between the Spanish and English languages.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ArtHum and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Junot Diaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao (Riverhead Trade, 2008)
     

Spanish 170: Introduction to Latin American Culture (Introducción a la cultura latinoamericana: Aproximaciones desde los estudios culturales)

Raquel Garcia, Graduate Student
MWF 2:10-3:00P, 101 Olson
59770

Course Description: This course provides a general introduction to the cultural production of Latin American while presenting students with a range of critical tools for analyzing a broad range of cultural texts, including short stories, poetry, essays, literary crónicas, political discourses, popular legends, films, paintings, popular music and testimonios. Sample cultural texts will be analyzed from a range of critical perspectives and time periods—though emphasis will be placed on the post-1960s era—with an eye toward understanding their politics, aesthetics, ethics, and ideologies. We will also look at these texts, not only as a cultural product but also as production, or the creative and disseminating processes in tandem with cultural consumption.  This course will serve as a “gateway” course that seeks to equip students with the tools needed to succeed in more advanced upper division Spanish courses. Topics to be considered may include: colonialism, the “idea” of Latin America, cultural heterogeneity, identity formations, social movements, violence and dictatorship, globalization, and neoliberalism.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): ArtHum and Div.
GE credit (New): ArtHum, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and WrtExp.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • All Readings will be on SmartSite
     

Spanish 177: California and Latin America

Robert Irwin, Professor
TR 1:40-3:00P, 202 Wellman (LEC)

Discussion Sections:

D. Pardo Pedrazo/J. Cajigas
Sec. 01. T 4:10-5:00P, 125 Olson
CRN 59774


D. Pardo Pedrazo/J. Cajigas
Sec. 02. W 4:10-5:00P, 125 Olson
CRN 59775


D. Pardo Pedrazo/J. Cajigas
Sec. 03. R 4:10-5:00P, 125 Olson
CRN 59776

Course Description:
 Este curso trata la historia de contacto cultural como consecuencia de migraciones, invasiones, colaboraciones, conflictos, acuerdos, intercambios, influencias, etc. entre Alta California (ahora el estado de California de Estados Unidos) y el resto de América Latina desde la época de la guerra de 1846-1848 hasta la actualidad, con un enfoque en las representaciones hechas en América Latina (tanto en México como en otros países del continente) de California, las representaciones hechas en California (especialmente desde la industria emblemática de la expresión cultural del estado, la del cine hollywoodense) de América Latina, y también las representaciones hechas de la California latinoamericana, la de los Californios, los mexicanos, los braceros, los pachucos, los pochos, los chicanos, los centroamericanos, los chilenos y los demás “latinos” que han vivido y que viven en el estado, y que de alguna manera le han hecho a California no sólo una región latinoamericana, sino uno de los centros principales productores de cultura latino-americana.

May be taken to fulfill requirement for majors in Chicano/Latino literature/culture (in lieu of SPA 117, 174 or 176) - or as an elective.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S, or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): ACGH and DD.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader