Expanded Course Descriptions: Spring 2014

Please click here to see the Lower Division Spanish Courses as a PDF
Please click here to see the Upper Division Spanish Courses as a PDF

Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units)

Instructor Section  Day/Time Room CRN
Marta Altisent      01 TR 9:00-10:20A 7 Wellman 40117     
Emilio Bejel 02 TR 10:30-11:50A 229 Wellman      40118
John Slater 03 MW 10:00-11:50A      217 Olson 43774
Leopoldo Bernucci     04 TR 10:30-11:50A 127 Wellman 44162
*** Section 4 Just Announced ***

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or Spanish 24S or Spanish 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica  (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 115: History of the Spanish Language (4 units)
Robert Blake

TR 9:00-10:20A
226 Wellman
CRN 42711

Course Description: 
This course examines the Spanish language from its roots in spoken Latin to modernity. There will be emphasis on the close relationship between historical events and language change, and the role that literature plays in language standardization. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 115S.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, Spanish 24S, or Spanish 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • David A. Pharies, Breve Historia de la Lengua Española: Spanish Edition  (University of Chicago Press, 2007)
     

Spanish 116: Applied Spanish Linguistics (4 units)
Rebecca Estes

MWF 9:00-9:50A
207 Olson
CRN 40122

Course Description: 
In this course students will review both the most difficult structural properties of Spanish (e.g. aspect, mood, subordination, sequence of tenses) as well as the most promising methodological approaches to teaching Spanish.  The course will be informed by insights from the field of applied linguistics, including CALL, computer-assisted language learning, and pragmatics.  The material is appropriate for anyone in general wishing to deepen their linguistic knowledge of Spanish as well as for future language professionals who specifically seek a career in teaching Spanish at the secondary or post-secondary levels.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24 or Spanish 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Dale A. Koike and Carol A. Klee, Lingüística aplicada: Adquisición del español como segunda lengua [2nd Edition]  (Wiley, 2012)
     

Spanish 130: Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700 (4 units)
Cristina Gonzalez


TR 12:10-1:30P
204 Art
CRN 42701

Course Description: 
We will study representative works from the Medieval and Early Modern periods, such as "Cantar de Mio Cid," "La Celestina," "Lazarillo de Tormes" and "Don Quijote de la Mancha."

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, Spanish 100S, Spanish 141, Spanish 141S, Spanish 170 or Spanish 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Antonio Sánchez-Romeralo and Fernando Ibarra, Antología de autores españoles: antiguos y modernos, Volume I  (Prentice Hall, 1972)
     

Spanish 134B: Don Quijote II (4 units)
Charles Oriel

MWF 10:00-10:50A
110 Hunt
CRN 40125


Course Description: This course will focus on the second part of Cervantes’s masterpiece, Don Quijote, published in 1615. Aside from studying Cervantes’s novelistic technique and its 17-century context, we will also consider how his novel has affected the subsequent development of more modern fiction, including such authors as Miguel de Unamuno, Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortázar.

Prerequisite: Spanish 134A.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote: Legacy Edition [10th Edition]  (European Masterpieces, 2012)
     

Spanish 139: Modern Spanish Theater (4 units)
Marta Altisent


TR 12:10-1:30P
1020 Wickson
CRN 42702

Course Description: 
A chronological study of seven works by Spain's most famous playwrights, such as Federico García Lorca, Fernando Arrabal and Juan Mayorga, among others. The plays selected range from realism to anti-theater trends. They are examples of naturalist and expressionist drama, symbolist tragedy, surrealist play, theater of the absurd, and metadrama. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding their dramatic techniques, genres, styles, and exceptional/eccentric themes, in relation to historical, social and political factors of modern and contemporary Spain. A brief summary of prior dramatic traditions will also be offered.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, Spanish 100S, Spanish 141, Spanish 141S, Spanish 170 or Spanish 170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Miguel Mihura, Tres Sombreros de Copa  (Catedra, 2000)
  • Fernando Arrabal, El Cementerio de Automóviles, el Arquitecto y el Emperador de Asiria [7th edition]  (Catedra, 2004)
  • Federico García Lorca, Bodas de Sangre  (Catedra, 1990)
  • Fernando Fernán-Gómez, Bicicletas son para el Verano  (Austral Spain, 2009)
  • Juan Mayorga, El Chico de la Último Fila  (Ñaque Editora, 2008)
  • Federico García Lorca, Doña Rosita la Soltera o el Lenguaje de las Flores  (Biblioteca Nueva, 2013)
     

Spanish 142: Spanish Golden-Age Drama (4 units)
Charles Oriel

MWF 12:10-1:00P
147 Olson
CRN 40127


Course Description: This course will focus on the major dramas produced during Spain’s Golden Age (the 16th and 17th centuries). We will read dramas by Miguel de Cervantes (“La Numancia”), Lope de Vega (“Fuenteovejuna”), Tirso de Molina (“El burlador de Sevilla”) and Pedro Calderón de la Barca (“La vida es sueño”), among others. Aside from studying the dramas themselves, we will also consider the social, cultural and political contexts in which they were written, produced and performed and received.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, Spanish 100S, Spanish 141, Spanish 141S, Spanish 170 or Spanish 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Diez Comedias del Siglo de Oro [2nd Edition], ed. Jose Martel and Hymen Alpern  (Waveland Press, 1985)
     

Spanish 151: Survey of Latin American Literature from 1900 to the Present (4 units)
Michael Lazzara

TR 10:30-11:50A
168 Hoagland
CRN 40131


Course Description: Using a thematic approach, this course provides an introduction to contemporary Latin American literature through the close reading of major writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Analyses of short stories, novels, poems, music and films will open debates on important issues like the construction of identities, the writing of history and memory, colonialism, the effects of exile and migration, and the ever-renewed struggle between civilization and barbarism. As we read, our goal will be to discover how literature speaks in its own way about history, politics, identity and culture.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, Spanish 100S, Spanish 141, Spanish 141S, Spanish 170 or Spanish 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture—3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion—1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Cien años de soledad  (Nuevas Ediciones de Bolsillo, 2008)
  • Jose Emilio Pacheco, Las batallas en el desierto  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
     

Spanish 159: Ciencia y política del cuerpo humano en la literatura y el cine de América Latina (4 units)
Emilio Bejel

TR 1:40-3:00P
1150 Hart
CRN 42703


Course Description: SPA 159 se centra en interpretaciones de ideas científicas modernas (darwinisno, medicina, etc.) sobre el cuerpo humano en la literatura y el cine latinoamericanos desde mediados del siglo XIX hasta el presente. Esto implica un estudio de las representaciones del cuerpo humano como escenarios de las luchas científico-políticas sobre raza, género, sexualidad e identidad nacional en América Latina. Todos los materiales estarán en Smartsite y los estudiantes no tienen que comprar ningún libro.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, Spanish 100S, Spanish 141, Spanish 141S, Spanish 170 or Spanish 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • All materials will be on SmartSite
     

Spanish 175: Revolution, Dictatorship, Democracy: The Politics of Memory in Chile (1970-2014)  (4 units)
Michael Lazzara

TR 12:10-1:30P
168 Hoagland
CRN 42704


Course Description: Forty years after General Pinochet’s military coup (1973-1990) that violently overthrew President Salvador Allende’s democratically elected, socialist government (1970-1973), Chile stands as an international symbol of the horrors of dictatorship, the power of grassroots mobilization, and the struggle to forge democracy after dictatorship. This course introduces students to the battles being waged over history and memory, the struggles of human rights activists, the quest for truth and justice, and the emergence of powerful social movements. From an interdisciplinary perspective, we will examine topics like the revolutionary experiences of the 1970s; political violence under dictatorship; censorship; the role of film and literature in the battle for truth; forms of social resistance; the idea of justice; and the consolidation of democracy after periods of political upheaval.

Students need not know anything about Chile to enroll in this course. It is perfect for those interested in literary and cultural production and its relationship to history and politics. Students will work closely with excerpts from novels, short stories, songs, poems, films, testimonies, essays, political speeches, and journalism produced in Chile since the 1960s.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, Spanish 24S, or Spanish 33.
 
GE credit (Old): 
Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.
 

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Project - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Luz Arce and Pinochet's Chile: Testimony in the Aftermath of State Violence, ed. Michael Lazzara  (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
     

Spanish 176: Literature in Spanish Written in the United States (4 units)
Francisco Alarcon

MWF 11:00-11:50A
146 Olson
CRN 42705


Course Description: This course is a survey of the literary and cultural contributions of the main Spanish-speaking populations present in the U.S.: Chicanos, Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans, and other Latinos.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or Spanish 33.
 
GE credit (Old): 
Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): American Cultures, Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Francisco X. Alarcon, From the Other Side of Night/Del otro lado de la noche  (University of Arizona Press, 2002)
  • En Otra Voz: Antologia de la Literatura Hispana de los Estados Unidos, ed. Nicolas Kamellos, et al.  (Arte Publico Press, 2002)
  • Esta Puente, Mi Espalda: Voces De Mujeres Tercermundistas En Los Estados Unidos [Revised Edition], ed. Cherrie Moraga and Ana Castillo  (Ism Press, 1988)
  • Cuentos Hispanos de Los Estados Unidos [2nd Edition], ed. Julian Olivares  (Arte Publico Press, 1993)
     

*** JUST ANNOUNCED ***
Spanish 181: Cervantes' Delight: The First Best-Sellers of Castilian Literature (4 units)
Cristina Gonzalez

R 4:10-7:00P
263 Olson
CRN 44157


Course Description: The invention of the printing press brought about great social change. Reading for pleasure became possible for large numbers of people, who eagerly consumed romances involving love and adventure.  Many of these romances were quite long, such as the numerous imitations of Amadís de Gaula written in the course of the 16th Century.  But there were other romances that were chosen by publishers because they could be produced cheaply due to their short length.  In consideration of the important role publishers had in selecting and revising them, these fast-paced romances of medieval origin have been called a “publishers’ genre.”  These exciting narratives delighted the public of the Early Modern Era, and their readers encompassed a wide variety of people, from the Catholic Monarchs to Miguel de Cervantes, who was particularly fond of them.  This course will study a number of works representative of this “publishers’ genre,” including Enrique Fi de Oliva and Tablante de Ricamonte, which are key sources of Don Quixote de la Mancha.

Prerequisite: Senior standing; a major in Spanish or consent of instructor.
 
GE credit (Old): 
None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy and Writing Experience.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader