Expanded Course Descriptions: Winter 2014

Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units)

Section 01.
Linda Egan

TR 10:30-11:50A, 207 Olson
CRN 80758

Section 02.
Sergio Diaz-Luna
MWF 9:00-9:50A, 235 Wellman
CRN 83344

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 110: Advanced Spanish Composition (4 units)

Charles Oriel
MWF 10:00-10:50A, 235 Wellman
CRN 83345

Course Description: This course focuses on improving writing in Spanish. In addition to addressing the mechanics of clear writing (syntax and the structure of paragraphs and arguments), there will also be a thorough review of the Spanish grammatical system, including such important areas as narration in the past (preterite and imperfect), sequence of tenses, the uses of the subjunctive and conditional modes, and the rules of accentuation.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24 or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Frequent writing assignments.

Textbooks:

  • Maria Canteli Dominicis and John J. Reynolds, Repase y Escriba: Curso Avanzado de Gramatica y Composicion (7th Edition) (Wiley, 2013)
     

Spanish 111N: The Structure of Spanish: Sounds and Words (3 units)

Travis Bradley
MWF 1:10-2:00P, 118 Olson
CRN 80759

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, 24S, or 33, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, Antxon Olarrea, and Anna Maria Escobar, Introdución a la Linguistica Hispanica (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 113: Spanish Pronunciation (4 units)

Travis Bradley
MWF 2:10-3:00P, 118 Olson
CRN 80760

Course Description: This course focuses on the phonetics and phonology of modern Spanish varieties. Students will explore in a systematic and formal manner the similarities and differences between the sound systems of Spanish and English, with attention given to dialectal differences that exist among major varieties of Spanish spoken around the world. The course is of particular interest to prospective teachers seeking to formalize their understanding of the Spanish and English sound systems in order to assist future students with issues of pronunciation.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24 or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Jorge M. Guitart, Sonido y Sentido: Teoría y Práctica de la Pronunciación del Español con Audio CD (Georgetown University Press, 2004)
     

Spanish 117: Spanish for Bilinguals (4 units)
Cecilia Colombi

Lecture: TR 10:30-11:50A, 212 Veihmeyer

Discussion     Instructor     Day / Time Room CRN
01 Becky Conley   T 5:10-6:00P     116 Veihmeyer    80761    
02 Becky Conley   R 5:10-6:00P 90 SocSci 80762
03 Becky Conley   F 1:10-2:00P 116 Veihmeyer    80763

Course Description: Especially designed or students who are interested in teaching Spanish to heritage speakers. The course will focus on the cultural diversity of the main Spanish speaking populations in the U.S. and on applied language teaching methodologies in the context of teaching Spanish to heritage speakers at different levels. Course content includes: a review of the cultural diversity of the main Spanish-speaking populations in the United States: Chicanos/ Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans/ Neoricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans and other Latino communities who live in the United States. First and second language acquisition process. Teaching effective communicative skills in Spanish in the Interpersonal, Interpretative and Presentational modes. Register and genre pedagogy: Inclusion of materials in the classroom setting pertaining to the cultural and literary contributions of main Spanish-speaking groups in the U.S. Micro-teaching.

The course will be conducted primarily in Spanish through lectures, videos, individual, and group activities. There will be discussion sessions of micro-teaching, i.e. workshops based on students’ simulated in-class teaching.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1; Spanish 24, 24S or 33, or consent of instructor.  Spanish 116 recommended.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Oral Literacy.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Ed. Ana Roca and Mary Cecilia Colombi, Mi Lengua: Spanish as a Heritage Language in the United States (Georgetown University Press, 2003)
     

Spanish 130: Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700 (4 units)

John Slater
TR 4:40-6:00P, 158 Olson
CRN 84406

Course Description: This course examines the origin and development of Hispanic literary cultures.  Throughout the course, we'll be asking a very simple question: what stays the same about Hispanic cultures over time and what changes?  We will work toward an answer by reading some of the foundational works of Spanish literature: texts from the medieval through the baroque (roughly, from the 13th to the 17th century).  Our readings will include popular ballads and lyric poetry, prose, and drama.  For each genre, we'll consider out how literary forms evolve or die out, what persists and what disappears.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Anonymous, Ed. Cash and Murray, Vida de Lazarillo de Tormes y de sus Fortunas y Adversidades (Juan de la Cuesta, 2002)
  • Lope de Vega, El Caballero de Olmedo (European Masterpieces, 2004)
     

Spanish 133N: Golden Age Literature of Spain (4 units)

Emily Kuffner
MWF 12:10-1:00P, 261 Olson
CRN 80764

Course Description: In this survey course, we will explore the major literary works of Golden Age Spain (16th and 17th century) through the topos of reality and appearances (ser y aparecer).  We will examine how writers confronted the question of truth, and the nature of reality from a variety of perspectives, and discuss the history of Spain in this period and the cultural shift from the Renaissance to the Baroque period.  We will read representative works from a variety of genres (drama, novel, and poetry), including texts from Cervantes, María de Zayas, Calderón de la Barca, Garcilaso de la Vega, mystic poets, Quevedo, Góngora, the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes, and others. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Four Stories from Cervantes' Novelas Ejemplares (European Masterpieces, 2008)
  • Anonymous, Ed. Cash and Murray, Vida de Lazarillo de Tormes y de sus Fortunas y Adversidades (Juan de la Cuesta, 2002)
  • Pedro Calderon de la Barca, La Vida es Sueno (Catedra, 1977)
  • Maria de Zayas Y. Sotomayor, Novelas Ejemplares y Amorosas and Desenganos Amorosos (European Masterpieces, 2008)
     

Spanish 134A: Don Quijote I (4 units)

Charles Oriel
MWF 11:00-11:50A, 204 Art
CRN 80765

Course Description: This course focuses on the first part of Miguel de Cervantes’ masterpiece, Don Quijote de la Mancha, first published in 1605. Aside from discussing this novel’s universal appeal (it’s the second most-published book in history, except for the Bible), we will also consider its novelistic antecedents as well as the influences it has had on subsequent literature. We will also focus on some of the critical responses that Cervantes’ work has inspired.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote (European Masterpieces, 2012)
     

Spanish 142: Spanish Avant-Garde Literature, Painting and Cinema through the Works of Lorca, Dalí and Buñuel (4 units)

Daniel Herrera-Cepero
MWF 2:10-3:00P, 217 Olson
CRN 80766

Course Description: In this course, students will be introduced to a blooming of the Spanish culture so extraordinary that can only be paralleled with that of the Golden Age. Leading Spanish artists like Pablo Picasso, Joan Miró or Salvador Dalí changed for good the way we look at a work of art. Writers and poets like Federico García Lorca, among many others, put into play in the Spanish literary scene the youthful, energetic and vigorous inspiration of the Avant-garde movements. In the context of this frenzy for innovation, cinema, the “new art,” had to be given a prominent role, and it was also a Spaniard –Luis Buñuel—who first mastered the ability to produce Surrealist films.
The student will learn how to frame the artistic productions of the first third of the 20th Century in the social, historical and cultural context of Spain. Although we will read and analyze texts, paintings and films from many authors, we will focus on the –often interwoven– productions of Lorca, Dalí and Buñuel, whose friendship and personal vicissitudes are paradigmatic of this period.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 151: Survey of Latin American Literature 1900 to Present (4 units)

Emilio Bejel
TR 12:10-1:30P, 106 Olson
CRN 83346

Course Description: SPA 151 ofrece una introducción a la literatura y la cultura latinoamericanas desde fines del siglo 19 hasta el presente a través de la lectura cuidadosa de algunos de las obras (textos escritos y películas) más importantes de la región. En el curso transitaremos libremente entre diversos textos y producciones culturales (cuentos, poemas, ensayos y películas) que nos servirán como punto de entrada al debate sobre algunos problemas centrales de la cultura latinoamericana moderna. En cada clase, además de un análisis formal y temático de cada obra, se vinculará la misma con una reflexión en torno a la construcción de las identidades, la lucha de las mujeres y los grupos minoritarios por sus derechos, los chicanos, la violencia, los homosexuales, y cómo estos asuntos se relacionan con las épocas que llamamos modernidad y post-modernidad. Mientras vamos leyendo y comentando los textos, nuestro objetivo será entender cómo la literatura y el cine hablan a su manera de la historia, la política, la identidad y la cultura.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 153: The Latin American Short Story (4 units)

Ana Peluffo
TR 9:00-10:20A, 158 Olson
CRN 83347

Course Description:In this course we will study Latin American short fiction with a particular emphasis on the Southern Cone cultural region. We will pay special attention to the relationship between narrative and other cultural media including photography, music, and cinema. Theories of adaptation will be discussed by establishing a dialogue between textuality and visuality, filmic and narrative techniques. Other topics to be addressed  include theories of the short story,  literature and cyber-culture, gender and evolving concepts of privacy, and the ways in which contemporary authors use the form to  reflect on self and society . The course reader includes texts by Silvina Ocampo, Pedro Mairal, Samanta Schweblin, Romina Doval, Clarice Lispector, Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Felisberto Hernández,  and Ricardo Piglia among others. Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 159: Mexican Poetry (4 units)

Linda Egan
TR 1:40-3:00P, 1150 Hart
CRN 80768

Course Description: This special course covers Mexican poetry from its pre-hispanic compositions in Spanish translation before the European conquest to its latest manifestations in the twenty-first century. Texts will be analyzed according to cultural, historical and literary norms of the era (Renaissance, Baroque, Romantic, etc.), with emphasis on student participation in learning to understand poetic interpretation. Students have said they had no idea how much they were going to love poetry until they took this course.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Coursepack
     

Spanish 173: Youth Cultures in Latin American Film (4 units)

Ana Peluffo
Lecture: TR 12:10-1:30P, 146 Olson
Film Viewing: W 6:10-9:00P, 146 Olson

CRN 80772

Course Description: In this course we will study the representation of youth cultures in contemporary Latin American Cinema. We will focus on  “ youth" as a sociocultural category that is informed by discourses of gender, race and class. Special attention will be given to  the geographical and historical context of each film,  and to the portrayal of the experience of  growing up in Latin America.  Other topics to be discussed include gangs and pandillas, the recent filmic preoccupation with   disengaged youth, the association of the young with political and cultural rebellion, and the impact that neoliberal policies have on teen subjectivities.   Close readings of films by Israel Caetano, Ezequiel Acuña, Cary Fukunaga, Lucrecia Martel,  Gónzalez Inárritu and  Claudia Llosa among others  will be  supplemented by theoretical texts and interviews with the directors. Course will be conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S, or 33.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Film Viewing - 3 hours.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader