Spanish Spring 2015: Expanded Graduate Course Descriptions

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Spanish 205: Spanish Phonology (4 units)
Travis Bradley, Professor

M 4:10-7:00P
141 Olson Hall
CRN 52752


Course Description: Phonology is the subfield of theoretical linguistics that attempts to explain why sounds pattern the way they do in the languages of the world. This seminar provides an introduction to the organization of the Spanish sound system from the perspectives of linear and non-linear generative phonology. Comparisons will be made among Spanish dialects and with other languages as appropriate. Students will be able to (1) identify sound patterns from a set of data; (2) describe these patterns using the formalisms of phonological theory; (3) read, understand, and critique analytical proposals from the literature; and (4) explore a research topic in Spanish phonology.

Prerequisite: Some knowledge of phonetics and consent of instructor (tgbradley@ucdavis.edu); Linguistics 109 and 139 highly recommended.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Fonología generativa contemporánea de la lengua española [2nd Edition], edited by Rafael Núñez-Cedeño, Sonia Colina and Travis Bradley  (Georgetown University Press, 2014)
     

Spanish 224: María de Zayas and the Hispanic Baroque (4 units)
John Slater, Professor

T 4:10-7:00P
622 Sproul Hall
CRN 50274

Course Description:
 This is a course about three things: María de Zayas, movement, and the Baroque.  María de Zayas was one of the bestselling authors of the seventeenth century; her astounding Novelas amorosas y ejemplares form the centerpiece of this course.  Her Novelas often represent the problematic movement of human bodies, goods, and texts.  We will pay particular attention to illicit movement and appropriation that are nearly paradigmatic of the Baroque.  Lastly, we will use this Zayas as a point of departure to analyze the Hispanic Baroque, the Barroco de Indias, and neo-barroco.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor (jslater@ucdavis.edu).

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Bernardo de Balbuena, La Grandeza Mexicana
  • Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor, Novelas amorosas y ejemplares [2nd Edition]  (Catedra, 2000)
     

Spanish 274: Studies of a Major Writer, Period, or Genre in Latin American Literature (4 units)

Section 001: Theories of Iberia and Latin America (4 units)
Robert Newcomb, Professor

R 4:10-7:00P
622 Sproul Hall
CRN 50276

Course Description:
 This seminar focuses on Iberian and Latin American essays of national interpretation that question received definitions of Iberia and Latin America as geographic, historical and cultural entities. Chronologically, we will focus on the turn of the twentieth century. Many of the period’s finest peninsular and Latin American writers, in responding to rapidly changing conditions “on the ground,” bypassed literary genres such as the novel and poetry, and instead utilized essayistic texts to dialogue directly with their audience on questions of national and international significance. This move toward literary non-fiction resulted in some of peninsular and Latin American literature’s most incisive works on questions of national and regional identity, including the following, which we will read: Antero de Quental’s Causas da Decadência dos Povos Peninsulares (Causes of the Decline of the Peninsular Peoples, 1871), Oliveira Martins’s História da civilização ibérica (History of Iberian Civilization, 1879), José Martí’s “Nuestra América” (1891), Miguel de Unamuno’s En torno al casticismo (1902), José Enrique Rodó’s Ariel (1900), and Sérgio Buarque de Holanda’s Raízes do Brasil (1936). Secondary readings include Theodor Adorno, Alfredo Bosi, Edward Said, and Hayden White. Class discussions will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Good reading knowledge of Portuguese is helpful, but not required. English translations will be available for Portuguese texts.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor (rpnewcomb@ucdavis.edu).

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • None


Section 002: Emotion and Affect in Latin America (4 units)
Ana Peluffo, Professor

W 4:10-7:00P
622 Sproul Hall

CRN 50277

Course Description:
 This course  will examine the role of affect and feelings in the configuration of national, gendered and racial identities in Latin America. While tracing the complex genealogy of the discourse of affect in different cultural areas , we will discuss the political uses of emotion in indigenista and abolitionist narratives, the cultural representation of tears in literature and film, and the different models of sensibility that emerge in Latin American texts. Visual materials will be incorporated into our weekly discussions as well as theoretical texts on the emotions by Sarah Ahmed, Lauren Berlant, Eva Illouz, and Norbert Elias among others.

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor (aopeluffo@ucdavis.edu).

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Will be announced by professor