Spanish Spring 2016: Expanded Upper Division Course Descriptions

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Spanish 100. Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units) 

Section Instructor Days / Time Room CRN
001 Emilio Bejel, Professor MW 12:10-2:00P 101 Olson Hall 60528
002 Charles Oriel, Lecturer MWF 9:00-9:50A 1134 Bainer Hall 63576

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024/024S or 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica [Séptima Edición]  (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 110. Advanced Spanish Composition (4 units)    JUST ADDED!
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 12:10-1:00P
251 Olson Hall
CRN 64062

Course Description: This course focuses on improving writing in Spanish. In addition to addressing the mechanics of clear writing (syntax and the structure of paragraphs and arguments), there will also be a thorough review of the Spanish grammatical system, including such important areas as narration in the past (preterite and imperfect), sequence of tenses, the uses of the subjunctive and conditional modes, and the rules of accentuation.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024/024S or 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Maria Canteli Dominicis, Repase y escriba: Curso de avanzado de gramática y composición [7th Edition]  (Wiley, 2013)
     

Spanish 111N. The Structure of Spanish: Sounds and Words (3 units) 
Tracy Quan, Associate Instructor

MWF 1:10-2:00P
168 Hoagland Hall
CRN 62954

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024 or Spanish 033, or consent of instructor (trquan@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, et al., Introduccion a la Linguistica Hispanica [2nd Edition]  (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 115. Spanish Pronunciation (4 units)
Robert Blake, Professor

MW 10:00-11:50A
168 Hoagland Hall
CRN 62955

Course Description: This course examines the Spanish language from its roots in spoken Latin to modernity. There will be emphasis on the close relationship between historical events and language change, and the role that literature plays in language standardization. Not open for credit to students who have completed course 115S.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024/024S or Spanish 033, or consent of instructor (rjblake@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • David A. Pharies, Breve historia de la lengua española: Segunda edición revisada  (University of Chicago Press, 2015)
     

Spanish 116. Applied Spanish Linguistics (4 units)
Robert Blake, Professor

MW 2:10-4:00P
230 Wellman Hall
CRN 60536

Course Description: In this course students will review both the most difficult structural properties of Spanish (e.g. aspect, mood, subordination, sequence of tenses) as well as the most promising methodological approaches to teaching Spanish.  The course will be informed by insights from the field of applied linguistics, including CALL, computer-assisted language learning, and pragmatics.  The material is appropriate for anyone in general wishing to deepen their linguistic knowledge of Spanish as well as for future language professionals who specifically seek a career in teaching Spanish at the secondary or post-secondary levels.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024/024S or Spanish 033, or consent of instructor (rjblake@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Robert Blake and Eve Zyzik, El español y la lingüística aplicada  (Georgetown University Press, 2016)
     

Spanish 130. Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700 (4 units)
Cristina Gonzalez, Professor

TR 9:00-10:20A
1130 Hart Hall
CRN 63577

Course Description: We will study representative works from the Medieval and Early Modern periods, such as "Cantar de Mio Cid," "La Celestina," "Lazarillo de Tormes" and "Don Quijote de la Mancha."

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or Spanish 141/141S or Spanish 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Antonio Sánchez-Romeralo and Fernando Ibarra, Antología de autores españoles: antiguos y modernos, Volume I  (Prentice Hall, 1972)
     

Spanish 134B. Don Quijote II has been cancelled.


Spanish 142. Representations of the Spanish Civil War (4 units)
Matt Russell, Lecturer

MWF 11:00-11:50A
1150 Hart Hall
CRN 63693

Course Description: This course focuses on the myriad ways the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and its aftermath of violence has been remembered and represented in the past few decades. The goal of the course is to teach students how to analyze critically the way memory shapes and sometimes distorts our images of the past, especially when that past involves a collective trauma that problematizes representation. The course is interdisciplinary in nature and texts will include novels, short stories, a graphic novel, testimony, narrative and documentary films, photography and music along with readings in history, critical theory and criticism. Key issues covered in the course will include collective and post-traumatic memory, forgetting, the trans-generational transmission of memory, and the complexities of representation.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or Spanish 141/141S or Spanish 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Javier Cercas, Soldados de Salamina  (Tusquets Editores, 2001)
  • Ramón J. Sender, Requiem por un campesino español  (Espasa Calpe, 2010)
  • Helen Graham, The Spanish Civil War: A Very Short Introduction  (Oxford University Press, 2005)

Spanish 147. Anglos, Latinos & the Spanish Black Legend (4 units)   In English      [Cross-listed with EDU 147]
Cristina González, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 63574

Course Description: This course will enhance understanding between Anglos and Latinos by studying the birth and evolution of the so-called “Black Legend,” a 16th century myth that racialized Spaniards by representing them as uniquely brutal and avaricious people, characteristics attributed to their Muslim and Jewish roots, respectively.  Spaniards were presented as an impure and barbarian race that mixed with Native Americans and other non-Europeans in the Americas, producing a thoroughly inferior people.  In contrast, the English were depicted as a pure and civilized nation which brought progress to the New World and preserved its superiority by avoiding miscegenation.  The “Black Legend,” which underpins the doctrine of “Manifest Destiny,” was used to justify the appropriation of territories by the United States during the Texas Revolt, the Mexican-American War, the California Gold-Rush and the Spanish-American War, and it still affects how Latinos are perceived and treated in this country today.  The course will explore the presence of the “Black Legend” in contemporary American society through interviews and analysis of school textbooks.

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or consent of instructor (crigonzalez@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities, Diversity and Writing Experience.
GE credit (New): American Cultures Governance & History, Arts & Humanities, Domestic Diversity and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Fieldwork; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 151. Survey of Latin American Literature from 1900 to the Present (4 units) 
Leopoldo Bernucci, Professor

TR 10:30-11:50A
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 60545

Course Description: Latin American literature from 1900 to the present. Reading selections include fiction, poetry, drama, essays, and testimonio among others.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 153. Latin American Short Story (4 units) 
Leopoldo Bernucci, Professor

TR 3:10-4:30P
2016 Haring Hall
CRN 62957

Course Description: Evolution of the Latin American short story from the 19th century to the present. Emphasis will be on the contemporary period.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 160. Women, Culture and Political Activism in Latin America (4 units)
Ana Peluffo, Professor

TR 9:00-10:20A
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 62958

Course Description: In this course we will study the cultural production of Latin American women writers, film makers, visual artists, journalists and political activists from different geographical areas. We will discuss the global resurgence of feminism in recent years, the cultural representation of domestic violence and  human trafficking, how gender discourses intersect with class and race, and the impact of globalization and neoliberalism on women's lives. Authors to be discussed in class  include Selva Almada, Gabriela Cabezón Cámara, María Moreno, Eva Perón, Lucrecia Martel, Rosario Castellanos, Marta Lamas, Flora Tristán and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz among others. The course will be conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Upper division standing or consent of instructor (aopeluffo@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities, Diversity, and Writing Experience.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 171. Music from Latin America (4 units)      [Cross-listed with MUS 127]
Pablo Ortiz, Professor

TR 11:00-11:50A
203 Music Building
CRN 63813

Course Description: Examination of music from Latin America. Characteristic music (i.e., tango, bossa nova, salsa, musica motena, musica andina) as well as its implications in other musical genres. Taught in Spanish.

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor (pvortiz@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 177. California and Latin America (4 units)
Robert Irwin, Professor

Lecture
MWF 1:10-2:00P
216 Wellman Hall

Section Disc. Leader Days / Time Room CRN
001 TBA T 4:10-5:00P 105 Olson Hall 60548
002 TBA W 4:10-5:00P 244 Olson Hall 60549
003 TBA R 4:10-5:00P 101 Olson Hall 60550
004 TBA R 5:10-6:00P 101 Olson Hall 62959

Course Description: Este curso trata la historia de contacto cultural como consecuencia de migraciones, invasiones, colaboraciones, conflictos, acuerdos, intercambios, influencias, etc. entre Alta California (ahora el estado de California de Estados Unidos) y el resto de América Latina desde la época de la guerra de 1846-1848 hasta la actualidad, con un enfoque en las representaciones hechas en América Latina (tanto en México como en otros países del continente) de California, las representaciones hechas en California (especialmente desde la industria emblemática de la expresión cultural del estado, la del cine hollywoodense) de América Latina, y también las representaciones hechas de la California latinoamericana, la de los Californios, los mexicanos, los braceros, los pachucos, los pochos, los chicanos, los centroamericanos, los chilenos y los demás “latinos” que han vivido y que viven en el estado, y que de alguna manera le han hecho a California no sólo una región latinoamericana, sino uno de los centros principales productores de cultura latino-americana.

May be taken to fulfill requirement for majors in Chicano/Latino literature/culture (in lieu of SPA 117, 174 or 176) - or as an elective.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024/024S, or Spanish 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): American Cultures and Domestic Diversity.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader

Spanish 179Y. Science and Politics of the Human Body in the Spanish-Speaking World (4 units)   In English
Emilio Bejel, Professor, and John Slater, Professor

  Click here to view an introductory video for this course on YouTube  

W 4:10-6:00P
1100 Social Sciences Building
CRN 63646

Course Description: This course explores the intersections of power, media, and knowledge about the human body in Spain, Latin America, and the Hispanic-Latina/o population in the United States from the 16th century to the present, with a particular focus on Latin America during the last three centuries. If you think that some people are just naturally bad, for example, you probably think its natural that the state treats those people (and punishes those people) in a certain way.  In other words, your ideas about human nature affect the kind of government you want.  However, the reverse has often proven to be true, too: structures of power influence the way people understand human beings and human bodies.  That is especially true when it comes to issues of race, gender, and sex; governments and institutions long controlled whether people from different races could marry, for example. Not open for credit to students who have taken equivalent course Spanish 179.

Hybrid Mechanics (half in-class; half online)
Students will have in-class discussions (sometimes called the "face to face" portion of this course or "f2f"), on-line assignments (including quizzes, videos, and discussion groups), and more traditional assignments (reading and writing).  All of the readings and other materials will be available on our course’s Canvas website (canvas.instructure.com/courses/817518).  There are no required books or readers.  However, class attendance and participation in f2f discussions are required.  So is participation in online activities through the Canvas site.  One of the first assignments in this class will be to learn how to use Canvas.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences or Science & Engineering.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences or Science & Engineering.

Format: Web Virtual Lecture - 2 hours; Discussion - 2 hours.

Textbooks:

  • All reading materials will be available on Canvas website.