Spanish Winter 2015: Expanded Upper Division Course Descriptions

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Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units)

Section Instructor Days / Time Room CRN
001 John Slater, Professor TR 9:00-10:20A 129 Wellman 90759
002 Cristina Martinez-Carazo, Professor TR 10:30-11:50A 229 Wellman 90760
003 Linda Egan, Professor TR 12:10-1:30P 1128 Hart 93194

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 24, 24S or 33.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica  (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 111N: Sounds and Words (3 units)
Travis Bradley, Professor

MWF 1:10-2:00P
146 Olson
CRN 90762

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024 or Spanish 033, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, et al., Introduccion a la Linguistica Hispanica [2nd Edition]  (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 117: Teaching Spanish as a Native Tongue in the US: Praxis and Theory (4 units)
Cecilia Colombi, Professor

TR 12:10-2:00P
212 Wellman
CRN 93196

Course Description: Especially designed or students who are interested in teaching Spanish to heritage speakers. The course will focus on the cultural diversity of the main Spanish speaking populations in the U.S. and on applied language teaching methodologies in the context of teaching Spanish to heritage speakers at different levels. Course content includes: a review of the cultural diversity of the main Spanish-speaking populations in the United States: Chicanos/ Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans/ Neoricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans and other Latino communities who live in the United States. First and second language acquisition process. Teaching effective communicative skills in Spanish in the Interpersonal, Interpretative and Presentational modes. Register and genre pedagogy: Inclusion of materials in the classroom setting pertaining to the cultural and literary contributions of main Spanish-speaking groups in the U.S. Micro-teaching.

The course will be conducted primarily in Spanish through lectures, videos, individual, and group activities. There will be discussion sessions of micro-teaching, i.e. workshops based on students’ simulated in-class teaching.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001; Spanish 024, 024S or 033, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Oral Literacy.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Mi Lengua: Spanish as a Heritage Language in the United States, edited by Ana Roca and Mary Cecilia Colombi  (Georgetown University Press, 2003)
     

Spanish 118: Diachronic and Synchronic Variation in Spanish (4 units)
Travis Bradley, Professor

MWF 3:10-4:00P
118 Olson
CRN 93197

Course Description: This course presents a survey of linguistic variation in Spanish across time and place. First, we examine structural developments since the period of spoken Latin, induced by natural language change and by external influences. This overview sets the stage for an exploration of the dialect structure of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world. Special consideration will be given to Judeo-Spanish, preserved by the Sephardic Jews expelled from Spain in 1492, and to Peninsular and American Spanish varieties. The course assumes that students have some prior exposure to Spanish phonetics and/or structural phonology.

Prerequisite: Spanish 111 and 112.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, et al., Introduccion a la Linguistica Hispanica [2nd Edition]  (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 131N: Survey of Spanish Literature: 1700 to the Present (4 units)
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 12:10-1:00P
115 Hutchison
CRN 93198

Course Description: This survey course focuses on Spanish literature from the 17th though the present day. This long period includes various literary, social, political and cultural movements, such as the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Naturalism, the Generation of ’98 and Surrealism, all of which will be taken into account and discussed in class. Readings include examples of all the main literary genres: essay, poetry, novel, short story and drama.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Fernando Ibarra and Alberto Machado da Rosa, Antología de Autores Españoles, Vol II: Antiguos y Modernos  (Prentice Hall, 1995)
  • Miguel de Unamuno, Abel Sánchez: Una historia de pasión  (Espasa Calpe/Austral, 2005)
  • Federico Garcia Lorca, Bodas de sangre (Catedra, 1990)
     

Spanish 133N: The Golden Age of Literature of Spain (4 units)
John Slater, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
217 Art
CRN 90768

Course Description: In this course, we will read and discuss literature written during a crucial moment in the development of Hispanic cultures: the 16th and 17th centuries. We will pay particular attention to theater and examine how writers confronted the question of truth and the nature of reality.  We will read representative works by María de Zayas, Lope de Vega, Calderón de la Barca, and others.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Pedro Calderon de la Barca, La Vida es Sueño [2nd Edition], edited by Vincent Martin (European Masterpieces, 2006)
     

Spanish 134A: Don Quijote I (4 units)
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 2:10-3:00P
1130 Hart
CRN 90769

Course Description: This course focuses on the first part of Don Quijote, Miguel de Cervantes’s masterpiece, first published in 1605. This novel, considered one of the most important in all of world literature, gives us a realistic portrait of life in Spain in the early 17th century, but, more importantly, incorporates a huge number of literary techniques that both recapitulate the entire western tradition and anticipate many later developments in the trajectory of the novel as a literary genre.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, Don Quijote [Legacy Edition], edited by Tom Lathrop  (European Masterpieces, 2012)
     

Spanish 141: Introduction to Spanish Culture (4 units)
Matthew Russell

TR 3:10-4:30P
141 Olson
CRN 93793

Course Description: Introduction to history, geography and culture of Spain, as well as art, history of ideas, and everyday cultural manifestations. Introduction to critical reading and textual analysis.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 148: Cinema in the Spanish-Speaking World in Translation (4 units)
Cristina Martinez-Carazo, Professor

Lecture: TR 1:40-3:00P
Film Viewing: TR 6:10-9:00P
1150 Hart
CRN 93199

Course Description: This course will analyze the construction of Spanish identity and the socio-historical events that have shaped it through film. The selection of movies and texts presented in this class will help the students to improve their ability to read films aesthetically, culturally, and historically. Cultural aspects such as gender differences, the role of women in Spanish society, the political situation, social structures, economical aspects, power institutions, religion will be studied through movies. The emphasis will be on the cultural information illustrated by these films. No prior knowledge of cinematography techniques and principles will be required.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Film Viewing - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Barry Jordan and Mark Allinson, Spanish Cinema: A Student's Guide  (Bloomsbury Academic, 2005)
     

Spanish 151: Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Literature (4 units)
Michael Lazzara, Professor

MW 10:00-11:50A
158 Olson
CRN 90771

Course Description: Using a thematic approach, this course provides an introduction to contemporary Latin American literature through the close reading of major writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Analyses of short stories, novels, poems, music and films will open debates on important issues like the construction of identities, the writing of history and memory, colonialism, the effects of exile and migration, and the ever-renewed struggle between civilization and barbarism. As we read, our goal will be to discover how literature speaks in its own way about history, politics, identity and culture.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Gabriel García Márquez, Cien años de soledad  (Nuevas Ediciones de Bolsillo, 2008)
  • José Emilio Pacheco, Las batallas en el desierto  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
  • A Course Reader from Campus Copies
     

Spanish 159: "The Mexican Short Story" (4 units)
Linda Egan, Professor

TR 1:40-3:00P
1130 Hart
CRN 90773

Course Description: Students will be introduced to what has been called the favored genre in Mexican narrative: brief prose fictions in the form of short stories or novellas. Due to the brevity of the course, we will focus on the period from the Mexican Revolution (1910) to the present. Authors will include the best-known canonical writers as well as excellent narrators among the newer additions to Mexican letters.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100, 100S, 141, 141S, 170 or 170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Carlos Fuentes, Aura  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
  • José Emilio Pacheco, Las batallas en el desierto  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 170: Introduction to Latin American Culture (4 units)
Ana Peluffo, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
1342 Storer
CRN 93201

Course Description: This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the cultural politics of Latin America from the pre-conquest period to the present. Using a vast array of sources including films, letters, personal diaries, poetry, and art we will reflect on issues and debates pertaining to the region’s cultural identity with a particular focus on the contemporary period.  During the quarter, we will discuss topics such as identity and social justice, civilization and barbarism, youth cultures, neoliberalism and the city, gender and ethnicity, violence, and migration.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 172: Mexican Cultural Studies: Los mexicanos en los Estados Unidos: Migraciones, choques, criminalizaciones (4 units)
Robert Irwin, Professor

TR 10:30-11:50A
146 Olson
CRN 93202

Course Description: This course reviews the phenomenon of migration from Mexico to the United States from the era of the gold rush to the present, with a focus on how this movementm has become an emblematic element of the national culture of both countries.  Although the migration of Mexicans to the United States has been a constant in the history of North America, it has always led to conflict, and sometimes violence.  In addition, the visibilization of Mexicans in the US seems to correlate to a simultaneous process of criminalization.  This course surveys key moments in the history of these migrations (the Gold Rush, the Mexican Revolution, World War II, the civil rights movement, and after 9/11) and the cultural and legal issues that have arisen as a consequence. Through readings of a diverse body of cultural texts (autobiography, testimonial, historiography, literature, film, popular music, among others), the course will elicit the analysis of both the will of immigrants to persevere despite formidable obstacles, and the justifications presented for their rejection.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • All readings will be posted on SmartSite
     

Spanish 175: Speaking Truth to Power: Testimonial Literature in Latin America (4 units)
Michael Lazzara, Professor

MW 2:10-3:30P
168 Hoagland
CRN 93203

Course Description: “Presented as the authentic testimony of the disenfranchised, the colonized and the oppressed, testimonio has [in recent decades] emerged as one of the most significant genres [in Latin American] literature” (Guguelberger et al., The Real Thing). Latin American writers and activists have long used the literary word as a means to speak truth to power, to denounce situations of injustice or of grave human rights violations. This course will introduce students to a series of first-person accounts that have marked debates on the testimonial genre in Latin America. Although we will examine a few early texts like José Martí’s “El presidio político en Cuba” and Miguel Barnet’s Biografía de un cimarrón, the course will mostly focus on testimonies written after the 1960’s, like Rigoberta Menchú’s famous account Yo me llamo Rigoberta Menchú y así me nació la conciencia. While the first half of the course will engage in a general discussion of testimonio as a genre connected to trauma, violence, memory, human rights, and justice-seeking, the second half of the course will focus more specifically on the case of Argentina after the “Dirty War” of 1976-1983. We will use Argentina as a case study to understand how societies that have gone through tumultuous periods of dictatorship struggle to come to terms with the past and construct historical memory in its aftermath. At its core, this course is about how literature intersects with history, politics, and ethics.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Project - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Juan José Saer, El entenado  (Editorial Seix Barral, 2005)
  • Luz Arce and Pinochet's Chile: Testimony in the Aftermath of State Violence, edited by Michael Lazzara  (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011)
  • A Course Reader from Campus Copies

NOTE: This course satisfies one of the core requirements for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Human Rights. It can also be counted as an elective course for the Minor in Latin American and Hemispheric Studies. Finally, the course is a perfect preparatory step for students considering Professor Lazzara’s summer abroad program in Chile, “Human Rights and Democracy in Chile,” scheduled for August 2015.


Spanish 182: Science and Politics of the Human Body in Latin America (4 units)
Emilio Bejel, Professor

W 2:10-5:00P
117 Olson
CRN 93204

Course Description: SPA 182 es un curso que explora las intersecciones entre poder y conocimiento sobre el cuerpo humano en América Latina desde mediados del siglo XIX hasta el presente. El curso se estructura alrededor de ciertas intersecciones entre el poder político, los medios literarios y audiovisuales y el conocimiento sobre el cuerpo humano que aparece explícito o implícito en algunos conceptos científicos. El enfoque geográfico se centra en Argentina, México y Cuba, pero puede expandirse de acuerdo a los intereses de los estudiantes. Entre los autores que se incluirán en el curso están Domingo Faustino Sarmiento, José Martí, José Hernández, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Justo Sierra, José Vasconcelos, Jorge Luis Borges, y otros autores y directores cinematográficos. Entre algunos de los temas principales del curso se encuentran el darwinismo, el lamarckismo, la ciencia ficción, el ciberpunk, la cibernética, la "imaginación razonada" de Borges, y alguans de las consecuencias que estos asuntos tienen en cuanto a raza, género, sexualidad e identidad nacional. Todos los textos y películas estarán incluidos en Smartsite o en Canvas. No hay que comprar ningún libro.

Objetivos:

1. Analizar cómo la literatura y el cine latinoamericanos representan ideas científicas modernas.

2. Comprender las maneras en que algunas representaciones de conceptos científicos modernos en la cultura de América Latina a menudo resultan en acciones y programas políticos que afectan los cuerpos de individuos y grupos diversos.

3. Expandir nuestra comprensión crítica acerca de las maneras en que las manipulaciones mediáticas que afectan los cuerpos humanos sirven de fundamento a las políticas de raza, género, clase, sexualidad e identidad nacional.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024, 024S, or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Project - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • All readings will be made available on SmartSite or Canvas