Spanish Winter 2016: Expanded Upper Division Course Descriptions

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Spanish 100. Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units) 

Section Instructor Days / Time Room CRN
001 Cristina Martinez-Carazo, Professor TR 12:10-1:30P 1134 Bainer Hall 40837
002 Fernanda Righi MWF 12:10-1:00P 129 Wellman Hall 40839

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024/024S or 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica [Séptima Edición]  (McGraw Hill, 2011)
     

Spanish 111N. Sounds and Words (3 units) 
Travis Bradley, Professor

MWF 12:10-1:00P
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 40840

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024 or Spanish 033, or consent of instructor.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Jose Ignacio Hualde, et al., Introduccion a la Linguistica Hispanica [2nd Edition]  (Cambridge University Press, 2010)
     

Spanish 113. Spanish Pronunciation (4 units)
Travis Bradley, Professor

MWF 2:10-3:00P
106 Olson Hall
CRN 43811

Course Description: This course focuses on the phonetics and phonology of modern Spanish varieties. Students will explore in a systematic and formal manner the similarities and differences between the sound systems of Spanish and English, with attention given to dialectal differences that exist among major varieties of Spanish spoken around the world. The course is of particular interest to prospective teachers seeking to formalize their understanding of the Spanish and English sound systems in order to assist future students with issues of pronunciation.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001 and Spanish 024 or 033.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Jorge M. Guitart, Sonido y Sentido: Teoría y Práctica de la Pronunciación del Español con Audio CD  (Georgetown University Press, 2004)
     

Spanish 117. Teaching Spanish as a Native Tongue in the US: Praxis and Theory (4 units)
Cecilia Colombi, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
158 Olson Hall
CRN 44361

Course Description: Especially designed for students who are interested in teaching Spanish to heritage speakers. The course will focus on the cultural diversity of the main Spanish speaking populations in the U.S. and on applied language teaching methodologies in the context of teaching Spanish to heritage speakers at different levels. Course content includes: a review of the cultural diversity of the main Spanish-speaking populations in the United States: Chicanos/ Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans/ Neoricans, Cuban-Americans, Central Americans and other Latino communities who live in the United States. First and second language acquisition process. Teaching effective communicative skills in Spanish in the Interpersonal, Interpretative and Presentational modes. Register and genre pedagogy: Inclusion of materials in the classroom setting pertaining to the cultural and literary contributions of main Spanish-speaking groups in the U.S. Micro-teaching.

The course will be conducted primarily in Spanish through lectures, videos, individual, and group activities. There will be discussion sessions of micro-teaching, i.e. workshops based on students’ simulated in-class teaching.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 001; Spanish 024/024S or 033, or consent of instructor (cmcolombi@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Oral Literacy.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA
     

Spanish 134A. Don Quijote I (4 units)
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 11:00-11:50A
2016 Haring Hall
CRN 40845

Course Description: This course focuses on the first part of Don Quijote by Miguel de Cervantes, published in 1605. We will study key elements of Cervantes's masterpiece within the socio-cultural context of Golden Age Spain and as prototype for the modern novel.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbook:

  • Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quijote (Legacy Edition), edited by Tom Lathrop  (European Masterpieces, 2012)
     

Spanish 139. Modern Spanish Theater (4 units)
Juan Hernando-Vazquez

MWF 9:00-9:50A
229 Wellman Hall
CRN 44370

Course Description: Forgetfulness is full of memory, the title of one of Jerónimo López Mozo´s plays, can synthesize the ways in which the recent Spanish past survives in the present. This seminar will analyze the trends and topics related to the Spanish Civil War in contemporary Spanish theatre (1980-2014): ideologies in dispute, life in jail, the disappeared buried in mass graves throughout Spain, the Spaniards in the Mauthausen concentration camp, and the debate over the importance of remembering or forgetting the past, among others. The plays selected for study range from realism to satire or comedy in order to provide access to different genres and dramatic techniques while approaching the polemic field of historical memory.

Some of the texts we will be working with include: ¡Ay, Carmela!, by José Sanchís Sinisterra; El volcán de la pena escupe llanto, by Alberto Miralles; Misión al pueblo desierto, by Antonio Buero Vallejo; Presas, by Ignacio del Moral and Verónica Fernández; and El triángulo azul, by Mariano Llorente and Laila Ripoll.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Antonio Buero Vallejo, Misión al pueblo desierto  (Espasa Calpe Mexicana, 2000)
  • José Sanchís Sinisterra, Ñaque / ¡Ay, Carmela!  (Catedra, 2006)
     

Spanish 142. Special Topics in Spanish Cultural and Literary Studies (4 units)

Section 001. Love in Renaissance and Baroque Spanish Literature (4 units) 
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 1:10-2:00P
108 Hoagland Hall
CRN 43812

Course Description: This course focuses on representations of love in classic literary works from Spain’s Golden Age (16th and 17th centuries). This theme is, of course, related to a number of other ones, which will also be discussed, such as honor, death, the monarchy and society, as a whole. Includes readings from the major literary genres: poetry, novels and drama.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Fernando de Rojas, La Celestina, edited by Patricia S. Finch  (European Masterpieces, 2003)
  • Tirso de Molina, El burlador de Sevilla, edited by R. John McCaw  (European Masterpieces, 2003)
  • Lope de Vega, El caballero de Olmedo, edited by Edward H. Friedman  (European Masterpieces, 2004)
  • Lope de Vega, El castigo sin venganza, edited by Edward H. Friedman  (European Masterpieces, 2012)


Section 002. Murder and Horror in the Spanish Baroque (4 units)
John Slater, Professor

TR 9:00-10:20A
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 43919

Course Description: Some of the most famous works of Baroque Spanish literature are about husbands killing their wives.  Both male and female authors wrote about domestic violence, painting gruesome portraits of bloody murders. In this course, we will read works of drama and prose that explore the psychology and the motivations of murderers, and imagine the horror of their victims.  This class will be a lot of fun, but is not for the faint of heart.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Pedro Calderón de la Barca, El mayor monstruo del mundo, edited by Ángel J. Valbuena-Briones  (Juan de la Cuesta, 1995)
  • Pedro Calderón de la Barca, El médico de su honra, edited by Carol Bingham Kirby  (LinguaText, 2007)
  • María de Zayas, Desengaños amorosos, edited by Alicia Yllera  (Cátedra, 2006)
     

Spanish 149. Latin-American Literature in Translation: Magical Realism (4 units) 
Robert Newcomb, Professor

TR 4:40-6:00P
168 Hoagland Hall
CRN 44364

Course Description: This course will focus on magical realism (realismo mágico), a current in mid-20th century Latin American literature that blended reality and fantasy, daily life and the supernatural, and the sacred and the profane. Novels written in a magical realist style, including Gabriel García Márquez’s classic One Hundred Years of Solitude, put Latin America on the global literary map, and offered readers a compelling and sometimes controversial way to interpret the history and culture of the region. We will focus on literary, cultural, and folkloric roots of magical realism, read some representative and lesser-known works in English translation, and discuss magical realism’s continued impact on Latin American and world literature, film, and culture at large. The authors we will read hail from a variety of countries and territories, including Cuba, Mexico, Colombia, Puerto Rico, and Martinique.

Prerequisite: English 003 or the equivalent.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities, Diversity and Writing Experience.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Gabriel García Márquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude, translated by Gregory Rabassa  (Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006)
  • Juan Rulfo, Pedro Páramo, translated by Margaret Sayers Peden  (Grove Press, 1994)
  • Alejo Carpentier, The Kingdom of this World, translated by Harriet de Onís  (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006)
  • Rosario Ferré, The Youngest Doll  (University of Nebraska Press, 1991)
  • Patrick Chamoiseau, Solibo Magnificent, translated by Rose-Myriam Réjouis and Val Vinokurov  (Vintage Books, 1999)
     

Spanish 151. Survey of Latin American Literature from 1900 to the Present (4 units) 
Michael Lazzara, Professor

TR 10:30-11:50A
168 Hoagland Hall
CRN 40848

Course Description: Using a thematic approach, this course provides an introduction to contemporary Latin American literature through the close reading of major writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Analyses of short stories, novels, poems, music and films will open debates on important issues like the construction of identities, the writing of history and memory, colonialism, the effects of exile and migration, and the ever-renewed struggle between civilization and barbarism. As we read, our goal will be to discover how literature speaks in its own way about history, politics, identity and culture.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Gabriel García Márquez, Cien años de soledad  (Nuevas Ediciones de Bolsillo, 2008)
  • José Emilio Pacheco, Las batallas en el desierto  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
  • A Course Reader from Campus Copies
     

Spanish 157. Great Works of Latin American Literature and Culture: "Literature and Memory" (4 units)
Michael Lazzara, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
168 Hoagland Hall
CRN 43814

Course Description: In recent years, the topic of memory has piqued scholarly interest in the fields of both literary and cultural studies. Debates centering on the purposes and implications of remembering and forgetting (in their individual and collective dimensions) have proven relevant to our understanding of narrative, politics, history and ethics. Particularly in the aftermath of the Holocaust or the recent dictatorships of Latin America, such debates are more salient than ever. In this course, a close analysis of cultural objects that engage the representation of the past through their form and content will introduce students to this burgeoning field. Topics to be discussed include: memory’s imaginative and literary dimensions; the relationship between memory and history; memory as philosophical problem; autobiography; cultural memory and tradition; dictatorship and post-traumatic narratives; memory in neoliberal times; testimony, witnessing and the subaltern; and second-generation “post-memories.” In addition to novels, short stories, poems, and films, students will engage with some conceptual texts on memory by major intellectuals writing from within and beyond Latin America.
Authors and filmmakers may include: Gabriela Mistral, José Martí, Jorge Luis Borges, Juan José Saer, Miguel Barnet, José María Arguedas, Albertina Carri, Andrés Di Tella, Marco Bechis, Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, Ricardo Piglia, Tununa Mercado and Diamela Eltit.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Juan Jose Saer, El entenado  (Editorial Seix Barral, 2005)
  • A Course Reader from Campus Copies
     

Spanish 159. Emotions and Latin American Culture (4 units)
Ana Peluffo, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P
108 Hoagland Hall
CRN 40849

Course Description: In this course we will study the language of emotions (fear, love, anger, sadness, hatred, disgust) in a variety of cultural products including film, children’s books, short stories, television and music. Topics to be discussed include the cultural construction of emotions, the hierarchization of emotions, the differences between affect and emotions, and the role of emotions in political movements. Theoretical texts on particular emotions will be included in the course reader as well as short stories, film and television by Felisberto Hernández, Amado Nervo, Eduarda Mansilla, Flora Tristán, Horacio Quiroga, Claudia Llosa, Israel Adrián Caetano and Daniel Sczifron among others.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100/100S or 141/141S or 170/170S.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader
     

Spanish 172. Mexican Cultural Studies: "Cien Años de Soledad Mexicana" (4 units)
Robert Irwin, Professor

MW 10:00-11:20A
212 Wellman Hall
CRN 40852

Course Description: Este curso revisa los últimos cien años de la historia cultural mexicana, desde la Revolución de los 1910s hasta la actualidad. Se enfoca en varios hitos para la cultural nacional, enfocándose en los programas culturales de la posrevolución (el muralismo), el auge de la industria cultural mexicana (radio, cine, historieta, telenovela), momentos transcendentales de conflicto (los juegos olímpicos de 1968, la implementación del Tratado de Libre Comercio y la rebelión de los zapatistas) y las tendencias transnacionales (el pachuco, la narcocultura), y tomando en cuenta los grandes conceptos que pretenden definir la cultura nacional: "la raza cósmica", "la condición post-mexicana" y "el laberinto de la soledad", pasando por el pensamiento indigenista, nacionalista, feminista y posmodernista. El objetivo del curso no es, sin embargo, definir la cultura nacional mexicana, sino más bien analizar los conflictos ideológicos y las luchas culturales que contextualizan la producción y difusión de las grandes obras del último siglo.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024/024S or 033, or consent of instructor (rmirwin@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities and Domestic Diversity.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Visual Literacy and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • Electronic materials to be distributed by instructor.