Spanish Winter 2018: Expanded Upper Division Course Descriptions

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Spanish 100. Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism (4 units)

Section

Instructor

Days / Time Room CRN

001

Charles Oriel, Lecturer MWF 10:00-10:50A 163 Olson Hall 71647

002

Emilio Bejel, Professor TR 4:40-6:00P 105 Olson Hall 71648

Course Description: This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama, and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks: 

Section 001:

  • Carmelo Virgillo, Edward Friedman, and Teresa Valdivieso, Aproximaciones al Estudio de la Literatura Hispánica [Séptima Edición]  (McGraw Hill, 2011)

Section 002:

  • TBA

Spanish 110. Advanced Spanish Composition (4 units)
Charles Oriel, Lecturer

MWF 1:10-2:00P
101 Olson Hall
CRN 71650

Course Description: This course focuses on improving writing in Spanish. In addition to addressing the mechanics of clear writing (syntax and the structure of paragraphs and arguments), there will also be a thorough review of the Spanish grammatical system, including such important areas as narration in the past (preterite and imperfect), sequence of tenses, the uses of the subjunctive and conditional modes, and the rules of accentuation.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours.

Textbook:

  • Maria Canteli Dominicis, Repase y escriba: Curso avanzado de gramática y composición [Séptima Edición]  (Wiley, 2013)

Spanish 115. History of the Spanish Language (4 units)
Eric Jensen, Lecturer

MWF 12:10-1:00P
113 Hoagland Hall
CRN 74645

Course Description: This course examines the Spanish language from its roots in spoken Latin to modernity. There will be emphasis on the close relationship between historical events and language change, and the role that literature plays in language standardization.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033, or consent of instructor; Linguistics 001 recommended.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities or Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA

Spanish 116. Applied Spanish Linguistics (4 units)
Claudia Sanchez-Gutierrez, Professor

TR 1:40-3:00P
118 Olson Hall
CRN 74646

Course Description: Exploration of the major theoretical and practical issues concerning learning Spanish as a second language. For students interested in teaching Spanish as a career.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033, or consent of instructor (chsanchez@ucdavis.edu); Linguistics 001 recommended.

GE credit (Old): Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Social Sciences.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Writing/Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA

Spanish 117. Teaching Spanish as a Native Tongue in the US: Praxis and Theory (4 units)
Cecilia Colombi, Professor

Lecture:
TR 9:00-10:20A
223 Olson Hall

Discussion Sections:

Section Discussion Leader Day / Time Room CRN

001

Melissa Patiño-Vega T 4:10-5:00P 110 Hunt Hall 71653

002

Melissa Patiño-Vega T 5:10-6:00P 125 Wellman Hall 71654

003

Melissa Patiño-Vega T 6:10-7:00P 211 Wellman Hall 71655

Course Description: Designed for students interested in teaching Spanish to native speakers. Focus on cultural diversity of the Spanish speaking population in the United States; applied language teaching methodologies in the context of teaching Spanish to native speakers at different levels.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033, or consent of instructor (cmcolombi@ucdavis.edu); Linguistics 001 recommended.

GE credit (Old): None.
GE credit (New): Oral Literacy.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper/Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbook:

  • Mi Lengua: Spanish as a Heritage Language in the United States, edited by Ana Roca and Mary Cecilia Colombi  (Georgetown University Press, 2003)

Spanish 137N. Twentieth-Century Spanish Fiction (4 units)
Diana Aramburu, Professor

TR 3:10-4:30P
223 Olson Hall
CRN 71657

Course Description: Study of novels and short stories that represent innovative literary techniques as well as the ideological changes that have taken place in the second half of twentieth-century Spain in connection with the historical tensions following the Spanish Civil War, through the dictatorship, the democratic transition, the desencanto, and the current socioeconomic crisis as reflected in these fictions.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100 or 141 or 170. 

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, World Cultures and Writing Experience.


Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader

Spanish 142. Women Writers from Spain (4 units)
Diana Aramburu, Professor

TR 12:10-1:30P

2016 Haring Hall
CRN 74647

Course Description: Special topics in the study of Spanish literature and culture. May be repeated for credit up to two times.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100 or 141 or 170.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader: "Women Writers of Spain"

Spanish 144. Imágenes de la inmigración (4 units)
Cristina Martínez-Carazo, Professor

MW 12:10-2:00P
1204 Haring Hall
CRN 71658

Course Description: En este curso vamos a explorar cómo se construye la imagen del inmigrante y qué tipo de representaciones genera en España. Para ello nos centraremos en cuatro tipos de “productos culturales": (1) Medios de comunicación, (2) Fotografía, (3) Literatura, (4) Cine. En la parte correspondiente a medios de comunicación (1) analizaremos primero la función y el poder de los medios, en especial la prensa y la televisión, a la hora de definir la figura del “otro” inmigrante. En la parte correspondiente a fotografía (2) veremos cómo las imágenes captan, fijan y reflejan la imagen visual del inmigrante. En la parte correspondiente a literatura (3) leeremos una selección de cuentos de escritores españoles que abordan el tema de la inmigración desde diferentes perspectivas. Finalmente en la parte correspondiente al cine (4) veremos y discutiremos dos películas, Poniente, que se centra en la presencia de inmigrantes árabes en España y Princesas que intentan construir una historia desde el punto de vista del inmigrante, no del receptor. Veremos también dos cortos, Hiyab y Proverbio chino para debatir el tema de la competencia intercultural.

Prerequisite: Spanish 024 or 033.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Project (Term Project) - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • TBA

Spanish 159. Affect and Emotion in Latin American Culture (4 units)
Ana Peluffo, Professor

TR 9:00-10:20A
1130 Hart Hall
CRN 71659

Course Description: In this course we will study the cultural construction of emotions (fear, love, anger, sadness, envy, shame, hatred, and disgust) in a variety of settings. By watching Latin American films and reading short stories, essays, and poems, we will explore the role that emotions play in the formation of cultural identity. Course themes will include the relationship between reason and emotion, the association of certain emotions with women and racialized others, the theorization of love and happiness, sexual shaming, and the ways in which emotions are used as political tools to create barriers between social groups. Readings by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda, Felisberto Hernández, Horacio Quiroga, Horacio Castellanos Moya, and Eva Perón among others. Theoretical texts on the emotions will also be included in the reader.

Spanish 159 may be repeated for credit up to one time if topic or subject differs.

Prerequisite: Spanish 100 or 141 or 170.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities and World Cultures.

Format: Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper/Discussion - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • A Course Reader

Spanish 179Y. Science and Politics of the Human Body in the Spanish-Speaking World (4 units)     In English
John Slater, Professor
Emilio Bejel, Professor

W 1:10-3:00P
1010 Pitzer Hall
CRN 74649

Course Description: This course explores the intersections of power, media, and knowledge about the human body in Spain, Latin America, and the Hispanic-Latina/o population in the United States from the 16th century to the present, with a particular focus on Latin America during the last three centuries. If you think that some people are just naturally bad, for example, you probably think its natural that the state treats those people (and punishes those people) in a certain way.  In other words, your ideas about human nature affect the kind of government you want.  However, the reverse has often proven to be true, too: structures of power influence the way people understand human beings and human bodies.  That is especially true when it comes to issues of race, gender, and sex; governments and institutions long controlled whether people from different races could marry, for example. Not open for credit to students who have taken equivalent course Spanish 179.

Hybrid Mechanics (half in-class; half online)
Students will have in-class discussions (sometimes called the "face to face" portion of this course or "f2f"), on-line assignments (including quizzes, videos, and discussion groups), and more traditional assignments (reading and writing).  All of the readings and other materials will be available on our course’s Canvas website (canvas.instructure.com/courses/817518).  There are no required books or readers.  However, class attendance and participation in f2f discussions are required.  So is participation in online activities through the Canvas site.  One of the first assignments in this class will be to learn how to use Canvas.

Prerequisite: None.

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities or Science & Engineering or Social Sciences.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities or Science & Engineering or Social Sciences.

Format: Web Virtual Lecture - 2 hours; Discussion - 2 hours.

Textbooks:

  • All materials will be online.

 


Spanish 181. El paisaje lingüístico de California: Introduction to Discourse Analysis (4 units)
Cecilia Colombi, Professor

R 1:10-4:00P
622 Sproul Hall
CRN 74669

Course Description: This course is an introduction to discourse analysis for the Spanish language from the perspective of a socio-semiotic theory of language: Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL). SFL is a social theory of language designed for use in educational linguistics, text analysis and interpretation. This functional description of grammar looks at language (and images) in terms of how it is used in ‘real situations’, i.e, considers language as a 'meaning making resource in social contexts'. In this course we will be paying special attention to the use of Spanish/English in the media and public spaces.

Texts used for authentic communicative interactions (e.g. newspaper articles, essays, public lectures, etc.) will be described to represent examples in the oral-written continuum of language. These texts will be used to describe the lexico-grammatical features that Spanish
takes in different registers from the oral to the more written ones. The description of the three systems of Spanish grammar: ideational, textual and interpersonal will be presented. An introduction to some aspects of multimodality will also be explored.

The following are some of the topics that will be discussed in the course:
• Oral and written language
• Genre and register theory
• Register: field, mode, tenor
• Metafunctions: ideational, interpersonal, textual.
• Ideational metafunction
• Interpersonal metafunction
• Textual metafunction
• Multimodality

Readings will be uploaded in Smartsite.

Prerequisite: Senior standing; a major in Spanish or consent of instructor (cmcolombi@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, 
Oral Literacy and Writing Experience.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • All materials will be online.

Spanish 182. El arte de la traducción literaria: un taller/ The Art of Literary Translation: A Workshop (4 units)
Michael Lazzara, Professor

T 1:10-4:00P
622 Sproul Hall
CRN 74650

Course Description: Translation, as we know, is not a simple activity. More than finding a word for word equivalency, translation means rendering a text creatively in another language with an eye toward its nuances, poetics, and cultural codes. It is also an illuminating way of engaging with and studying literature. What is translatable? What eludes translation? How should we approach translating the literary word artfully and responsibly? This senior seminar is meant for lovers of language and literature, for students eager to dive into the literary word closely and intimately. You will be amazed at how much can be learned by interacting so deeply with the literary word!

The class will be structured as a true workshop, a space in which we will work together to figure out what translation is and how to do it effectively. Part of each class session will explore perspectives on translation written by philosophers, critics, and practitioners of the craft. But most of our time will be spent actually doing translation. Students will work closely with texts by Spanish language writers (mostly from Latin America), translating them in part or in whole into English (a minimal amount of translation from English-to-Spanish will also be included). Students will also offer constructive feedback on their fellow students’ work. As a capstone to the seminar, the class will work together on a collective translation of a literary work.

Students who have taken Professor Lazzara’s Spanish 151 course, “Introduction to Latin American Literature,” will find this seminar particularly enjoyable, as many of the texts to be translated are those studied in that course. Spanish 151, however, is not a prerequisite.

Because our main task will be translation into English, the seminar will be a bilingual space in which linguistic and cultural codes can shift and be explored freely. Because of the nature of the work we’ll be doing, English will be spoken in many moments.

Most student work will take place in groups of 3-5. Students should expect to spend time each week meeting with their groups outside of class. If your schedule is particularly hectic and does not permit time for group meetings, you may not want to take this course.

Spanish 182 may be repeated for credit up to one time if content differs.

Prerequisite: Senior standing; a major in Spanish or consent of instructor (mjlazzara@ucdavis.edu).

GE credit (Old): Arts & Humanities.
GE credit (New): Arts & Humanities, Oral Literacy, World Cultures and Writing Experience.

Format: Seminar - 3 hours; Term Paper - 1 hour.

Textbooks:

  • Edith Grossman, Why Translation Matters  (Yale University Press, 2011)
  • José Emilio Pacheco, Las batallas en el desierto  (Ediciones Era, 2011)
  • A Course Reader will be available at Davis Copy Shop.