Undergraduate Courses: Spring 2010

Spanish 100: Principles of Hispanic Literature & Criticism
Marta Altisent, Professor (sec. 1, TR 10:00-11:50, 90 Social Science & Humanities) CRN 80330 
Leo Bernucci, Professor (sec. 2, TR 9:00-10:20, 90 Social Science & Humanities) CRN 80331

This course is an introduction to textual analysis with readings from Spanish and Spanish American literature and culture. The course will deal with basic genres: narrative, poetry, drama and essay and will provide students with the opportunity to acquire the basic technical vocabulary of the Hispanic literary and cultural critic.

Lecture - 3 hours; Extensive Writing or Discussion - 1 hour.

Prerequisite: course 24, 24S, or 33.

Textbook:

  • Edward Friedman, Approximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispanica (McGraw-Hill, 2008)

Spanish 111N: Structure of Spanish - Sounds & Words
Travis Bradley, Associate Professor (MWF 1:10-2:00, 146 Olson) CRN 80334

This course provides an introduction to the sound system of Spanish. After an initial overview of the goals of contemporary linguistic theory, we will explore how speech sounds are produced from an articulatory point of view. By exploring the structuralist notions of phoneme versus allophone, complementary distribution versus free variation, and contrast versus neutralization, we will see how sounds are organized and represented as part of the linguistic competence of Spanish speakers. The course also introduces generative phonology, which permits a deeper understanding of systematic, rule-governed nature of sound patterns. Throughout the course, theoretical and practical comparisons will be made with English and other Romance Languages as appropriate.

Lecture - 3 hours.

Prerequisite: Linguistics 1 and Spanish 24, 24S or 33 or Consent of Instructor.

Textbook:

  • José Ignacio Hualde, Antzon Olarrea, and Anna María Escobar, Introducción a la lingüística hispánica

Spanish 116: Applied Spanish Linguistics
Maria Cetto, Instructor (MWF 11:00-11:50, 1132 Bainer) CRN 80335

This course provides an introduction to the theoretical study of second language acquisition. The main goals of this course are to introduce the major concepts and terminology used to teach Spanish as a second language, to provide an overview of the different language teaching approaches, and review the issues related to the Spanish language learning.

Lecture/Discussion - 3 hours; Midterm Exam; Extensive Writing (Research Paper).

Prerequisite: course 24, 24S or 33 or Consent of Instructor.

Textbook:

  • Diane Larson-Freeman, Techniques and Principles in Language Teaching
  • D. Koike and C. Klee, Lingüística aplicada: Adquisición del español como segunda lengua.

Spanish 130: Survey of Spanish Literature to 1700
Charles Oriel, Lecturer (TR 3:10-4:30, 251 Olson) CRN 83111

We will read representative works from the Spanish "Golden Age" (1500-1625): Garcilaso, Fray Luis de León, Quevedo, the comedia, the picaresque novel, and Don Quijote. During the Golden Age, the distinctive religious tensions and problems which characterized the Hispanic Middle Ages, will continue to inform Spanish culture, giving rise to literary achievements of astounding richness and diversity and of far-reaching importance to subsequent European and American literature.

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • Antonia Sanchez-Romeraldo, Antologia de Autores Espanoles: Antiguous y Modernos, Volume 1 (Pearson, 1972)

Spanish 133N: Golden Age Literature of Spain
Adrienne Martin, Professor (TR 10:30-11:50, 205 Olson) CRN 83112

This course is (TBA)

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • TBA

Spanish 142: Women's Coming of Age Stories in Contemporary Women Writers
Marta Altisent, Professor (TR 1:40-3:00, 175 Chemistry) CRN 80339

This course is (TBA)

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • TBA

Spanish 151N: Introduction to Contemporary Latin American Literature
Michael Lazzara, Associate Professor (MW 12:10-2:00, 1150 Hart) CRN 83114

Using a thematic approach, this course provides an introduction to contemporary Latin American literature through the close reading of major writers of the 20th and 21st centuries. Analyses of short stories, novels, poems, music and films will open debates on important issues like the construction of identities, the writing of history and memory, colonialism, the effects of exile and migration, and the ever-renewed struggle between civilization and barbarism. As we read, our goal will be to discover how literature speaks in its own way about history, politics, identity and culture.

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • TBA

Spanish 153: Latin-American Short Story
Ana Peluffo, Associate Professor (TR 9:00-10:20, 205 Olson) CRN 83115

In this course we will do close readings of Latin American short fiction, graphic fiction, and micro-narratives with a particular emphasis on the Southern Cone cultural region. We will do interdisciplinary readings of Latin American short stories paying particular attention to the relationship between narrative and other cultural media including photography, music, cinema and popular culture. We will read narrative works that have been adapted to the screen, and we will discuss theories of adaptation by establishing a dialogue between textuality and visuality, filmic and narrative techniques. Other topics to be discussed in the course are the relationship between the short story and politics, the intersections between literature and cyber-culture, gender and evolving concepts of privacy, and the ways in which contemporary authors use the short story to map out new theories about Latin American fiction that put into question culturally inherited paradigms. The course reader includes texts by Julio Cortázar, Silvina Ocampo, Pedro Mairal, Angélica Gorodischer, Samanta Schweblin, Roberto Arlt, Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Felisberto Hernández, Baldomero Lillo, and Ricardo Piglia among others.

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • A Course Reader

Spanish 171: Música de América Latina
Robert Irwin, Professor (TR 10:30-11:50, 212 Wellman) CRN 83116

En esta clase se estudian las tradiciones musicales latinoamericanas y su relación con la cultura nacional y transnacional desde la perspectiva interdisciplinaria de los estudios culturales. Se trata de algunos de los géneros más importantes y conocidos en los mercados nacionales e internacionales del último siglo, incluyendo el tango, la samba, la ranchera, el son, la cumbia, la música andina, el mambo, la bossa nova, la música criolla, el corrido, la nueva canción, la tropicália, la salsa y el vallenato. Cada género se contextualiza por los procesos históricos de su nacionalización e internacionalización, con enfoque particular en los papeles de las industrias culturales y las políticas culturales. Se estudiará la música a través tanto de sus elementos formales (composición, letra, instrumentación, voz, arreglo, etc.) como de sus funciones culturales, ideológicas y comerciales. Entonces, no sólo se pensará la música como producto cultural sino que se tomará en cuenta su papel en los procesos culturales, procesos de formación de ciudadanos, de integración nacional, de participación cultural, de desterritorialización y de resistencia.

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • TBA

Spanish 173: Cinema and Latin American Culture
Emilio Bejel, Professor (CRN 83117)

In this course we will study the cinema of the Cuban Revolution. We will begin by contextualizing the relationship between politics and arts in Cuba from 1959 to the present and outlining the special role cinema has played in that debate among Cuban leftists. This class will have two basic orientations: (1) the discussion of the social subtext of some of the Cuban movies and documentaries of that period; and (2) the analysis of the techniques used in some of those works. Although we will be more content-oriented in our analysis, we will also deal with the importance of some of the outstanding Cuban filmmakers like Gutiérrez Alea, Tabío, and many others; the influence of foreign filmmakers like Fellini and especially Brecht, as well as cinematographic movements like the French New Wave, Italian neo-realism, and the Brazilian Cinema Novo. Moreover, we will study the common practice in Cuban cinema of the mixing of fiction and documentary, as well as the so-called “imperfect cinema.” Not only we will watch and analyze well-known, “classical” Cuban films like Memories of Underdevelopment, Portrait of Teresa, Guantanamera, and Strawberry and Chocolate, but we will also discuss other less known works like Wait List, Life is to Whistle, Who the Hell is Juliette?, Balseros, The Twelve Chairs, The Adventures of Juan Quin Quin, and others.

Lecture - 3 hours; Term Paper.

Prerequisite: course 100 or 100S

Textbook:

  • TBA

Spanish 177: California and Latin America
Robert Irwin, Professor

Lecture: TR 1:40-3:00, 1150 Hart

Discussion Section 1: T 4:10-5:00, 141 Olson (CRN 80352)
Discussion Section 2: W 4:10-5:00, 101 Olson (CRN 80353)
Discussion Section 3: R 4:10-5:00, 129 Olson (CRN 80354)

Este curso trata la historia de contacto cultural como consecuencia de migraciones, invasiones, colaboraciones, conflictos, acuerdos, intercambios, influencias, etc. entre Alta California (ahora el estado de California de Estados Unidos) y el resto de América Latina desde la época de la guerra de 1846-1848 hasta la actualidad, con un enfoque en las representaciones hechas en América Latina (tanto en México como en otros países del continente) de California, las representaciones hechas en California (especialmente desde la industria emblemática de la expresión cultural del estado, la del cine hollywoodense) de América Latina, y también las representaciones hechas de la California latinoamericana, la de los Californios, los mexicanos, los braceros, los pachucos, los pochos, los chicanos, los centroamericanos, los chilenos y los demás “latinos” que han vivido y que viven en el estado, y que de alguna manera le han hecho a California no sólo una región latinoamericana, sino uno de los centros principales productores de cultura latino-americana.

Lecture - 3 hours; Discussion - 1 hour.

Prerequisite: course 24, 24S, or 33.

Textbook:

  • A Course Reader